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Multi-Grain Waffles

Spring 2003, The Essential EatingWell Cookbook (2004)

Your rating: None Average: 4.2 (246 votes)

Traditional waffles are a butter-laden, high-carb indulgence, but they make the transition to good fats and smart carbs beautifully, yielding crisp, nutty-tasting waffles with all the sweet pleasure of the original. The batter can also be used for pancakes.



READER'S COMMENT:
"This recipe ROCKS! It's the only one I've found that doesn't stick to my waffle iron!! "
Multi-Grain Waffles

65 Reviews for Multi-Grain Waffles

09/25/2009
Anonymous

We served these waffles at an office breakfast and they were absolutely delicious. I liked mine plain without syrup.

Anonymous, Springfield, OH

Comments
09/25/2009
Anonymous

We love these waffles! I use equal parts of fat-free vanilla yogurt and skim milk in place of the buttermilk, and I replace one of the eggs with egg substitute. I served these with peach maple syrup (simmered some maple syrup and honey with sliced peaches).

Anonymous, Pittsburgh, PA

Comments
09/25/2009
Anonymous

These are very good. I have a hard time getting them to crisp up in my waffle iron, but they are yummy anyway. And when we freeze them and reheat in the toaster, then they come out nice and crisp.

Lori, Barkhamsted, CT

Comments
09/25/2009
Anonymous

These waffles are SO DELICIOUS that I always now make a bouble batch and freeze them. I can pop one in the toaster any day of the week for a special treat for the kids-and it's healthy! My two year old prefers maple syrup [hope you Vermont guys don't mind ;-) ] and my seven year old likes strawberry preseves. My husband bought Eggos the other day and the kids didn't like them!

Rachael, Dallas, TX

Comments
09/25/2009
Anonymous

I made the batter into pancakes and they were delicious. The nutty flavor of the pancakes paired with maple syrup was a real treat. I liked them better than traditional pancakes.

Anonymous

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