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Miso-Glazed Scallops with Soba Noodles

April/May 2005, The EatingWell Healthy in a Hurry Cookbook (2006)

Your rating: None Average: 4.5 (75 votes)

This Japanese-inspired dish uses one sauce--a sweet/salt combination of mirin and miso--to make both the marinade for the scallops and the caramelized pan sauce for the noodles. A good pairing would be a simple green salad dressed with a citrus vinaigrette.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Spectacular. One change I did make was to double the amount of sauce so that it was enough to use over the fried rice I made. Allen Peterson Strasburg, VA "
Miso-Glazed Scallops with Soba Noodles

Makes: 4 servings

Active Time:

Total Time:

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces soba noodles, or whole-wheat spaghetti
  • 3 tablespoons white miso, (see Ingredient notes)
  • 2 tablespoons mirin, (see Ingredient notes)
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 pound dry sea scallops, (see Ingredient notes), tough muscle removed
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup sliced scallions

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook noodles, stirring occasionally, until just tender, 6 to 8 minutes or according to package directions. Drain and transfer to a large bowl.
  2. Meanwhile, whisk miso, mirin, vinegar, canola oil, ginger and garlic in a medium bowl. Add scallops and stir gently to coat. Let marinate for 5 minutes (scallops will begin to break down if marinated longer). Using a slotted spoon, remove the scallops, reserving the marinade for the sauce.
  3. Heat olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the scallops and cook until golden brown, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Add the reserved marinade to the pan and cook over medium-high heat until brown, about 1 minute. Pour the sauce over the noodles, add scallions and toss to coat. Top with scallops and serve immediately.

Tips & Notes

  • Ingredient Notes: Miso: Fermented bean paste made from barley, rice or soybeans used in Japanese cooking to add flavor to dishes such as soups, sauces and salad dressings. A little goes a long way because of its concentrated, salty taste. Miso is available in different colors, depending on the type of grain or bean and how long it's been fermented. In general, the lighter the color, the more mild the flavor. It will keep, in the refrigerator, for more than a year.
  • Mirin: A low-alcohol rice wine essential to Japanese cooking. Look for it in the Asian or gourmet-ingredients section of your supermarket. An equal portion of sherry or white wine with a pinch of sugar may be substituted for mirin.
  • We prefer cooking with "dry" sea scallops (scallops that have not been treated with sodium tripolyphosphate, or STP). Scallops that have been treated with STP ("wet" scallops) have been subjected to a chemical bath and are not only mushy and less flavorful, but will not brown properly.

Nutrition

Per serving: 440 calories; 12 g fat (1 g sat, 1 g mono); 37 mg cholesterol; 8 g carbohydrates; 29 g protein; 3 g fiber; 611 mg sodium; 558 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Selenium (35% daily value), Iron (17% dv).

Carbohydrate Servings: 3 1/2

Exchanges: 3 1/2 starch, 2 very lean meat, 2 fat (mono)


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Recipe Categories

Ease of Preparation
Easy
Ethnic/Regional
Asian
Japanese
Total Time
30 minutes or less
Servings
4
Main Ingredient
Shellfish
Preparation/ Technique
Saute
Meal/Course
Dinner

Holiday
New Year's Eve
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