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Middle Eastern Chickpea Platter

July/August 2008

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This recipe combines the flavors of two Middle Eastern favorites—hummus and baba ganouj—in one easy dish. Serve it family-style, letting diners take their own favorite combination of ingredients. Serve with tabbouleh or a green salad tossed with lemon vinaigrette.



READER'S COMMENT:
"I just made this, using a fresh eggplant from my garden. I skipped the olives and bread, mixed in diced tomato and red onion and I'm really enjoying it as a salad! I'll be making this again, and again. Especially since I just bought my...
Middle Eastern Chickpea Platter

Makes: 4 servings

Active Time:

Total Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 small eggplant, (about 12 ounces), cubed
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 2 tablespoons tahini, (see Note)
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 15- or 19-ounce can chickpeas or cannellini beans, rinsed (see Tip)
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, plus more for garnish
  • 2 medium tomatoes, sliced
  • 1/2 medium red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup crumbled feta
  • 1/4 cup halved pitted briny black olives, such as Kalamata (optional)
  • 4 whole-wheat pita breads, warmed and cut in half or into wedges

Preparation

  1. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add eggplant, garlic and 1/8 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the eggplant is soft and beginning to brown, about 8 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, whisk tahini, lemon juice, water and the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt in a medium bowl. Stir in chickpeas (or beans), parsley and the eggplant.
  3. Arrange the chickpea-eggplant salad, tomatoes, onion, feta, olives (if using) and pitas on a platter. Serve at room temperature or chilled and sprinkled with more parsley, if desired.

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate the chickpea salad (Steps 1-2) for up to 4 hours.
  • Note: Tahini is a thick paste of ground sesame seeds. Look for it in large supermarkets in the Middle Eastern section or near other nut butters.
  • Tip: While we love the convenience of canned beans, they tend to be high in sodium. Give them a good rinse before adding to a recipe to rid them of some of their sodium (up to 35 percent) or opt for low-sodium or no-salt-added varieties. (Our recipes are analyzed with rinsed, regular canned beans.) Or, if you have the time, cook your own beans from scratch.

Nutrition

Per serving: 313 calories; 11 g fat (3 g sat, 5 g mono); 8 mg cholesterol; 46 g carbohydrates; 11 g protein; 10 g fiber; 648 mg sodium; 622 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (40% daily value), Folate (28% dv), Magnesium & Potassium (18% dv), Iron (15% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 2

Exchanges: 2 starch, 2 vegetable, 1 plant-based protein, 2 fat


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Recipe Categories

Servings
4
Main Ingredient
Beans/Legumes
Preparation/ Technique
Saute
Meal/Course
Dinner

Season
Summer
Fall
Type of Dish
Main dish, vegetarian
Ethnic/Regional
Middle Eastern
Ease of Preparation
Easy
Total Time
30 minutes or less
Publication
July/August 2008
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