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London Broil with Cherry-Balsamic Sauce

Spring 2004, The Essential EatingWell Cookbook (2004)

Your rating: None Average: 4 (30 votes)

London broil is a thicker cut of steak that benefits from the tenderizing effects of a marinade. Ours does its job and then doubles as a sauce when simmered with some shallots. Use any steak leftovers on top of a salad or in a sandwich with fresh spinach leaves.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Absolutely delicious. I started with a 1 LB brisket (it was nicer-looking than the London broil at my butcher counter) and my well-loved cast-iron grill pan. I didn't want to purchase cherry preserves just for this purpose, so instead I...
London Broil with Cherry-Balsamic Sauce

12 Reviews for London Broil with Cherry-Balsamic Sauce

04/18/2011
Easy & Tender

This was a great way to prepare a London Broil. I used my gas range with a cast iron grill and did about 10 mins each side as I like my beef on the rare side. I served it with the Panko-Crusted Asparagus Spears.
Not sure if maybe the side dish affected the flavor, but although the meat was good, it was slightly on the sweet side for me. I may try it again with cranberries or serving it with a more neutral side-dish. But still a keeper!

easy
Comments
01/23/2011
A restaurant meal at home

I made this following the recipie exactly, marinating for 8 hours and grilling the steak. It was amazing! It tasted like restaurant meal at home. The steak was tender and had wonderful flavor. The sauce had a sweet/tart combination that was so yummy. I served this with roasted potatos and asparagus. The potatos were a great addition as they were another place to pour the tasty sauce. My non-meat loving children gobbled this up, asked for seconds, and rated it a "make again"!

Quick, Simple, Delicious
Comments
12/25/2010
Awesome recipe

We don't eat a lot of red meat, so when we do we're looking for something unique. This recipe totally hit the spot. Instead of cherry preserves I used this strawberry balsamic jam (made by Stonewall Kitchen) that my husband picked up and of course I thought, what the heck am I going to do with this?! It was just perfect in this marinade/sauce. The meat came out flavorful and tender and the sauce turned out beautifully. I served it with steamed broccolini and mashed parsnip potatoes - delish!

Comments
05/10/2010

Absolutely delicious. I started with a 1 LB brisket (it was nicer-looking than the London broil at my butcher counter) and my well-loved cast-iron grill pan. I didn't want to purchase cherry preserves just for this purpose, so instead I used blackcurrant preserves. I also didn't have red wine on hand, and ended up using dry sake instead. In the future I'd do it again: I think sake does a better job of tenderizing the meat. I let everything marinate for about 2hrs and cooking time was approximately 13min on each side for medium (I was aiming for medium rare, but this was purely my fault--I was nervous cooking this thick a slab of meat for the first time). Either way, GORGEOUS crust on the meat, and it came out tender, smoky, amazing. Highly recommended!

Comments
12/26/2009
Anonymous

Delicious! I marinated it for the minimum time indicated and it was very juicy and tender. I didn't have cherry preserves so I used some leftover whole cranberry sauce, which I think I would do again for the slight tartness of the whole cranberries blended nicely with the sauce and were attractive, as well. Also, the cooking time indicated was on the rare side, so I cooked for 14 minutes per side and used a meat thermometer, took it to 145 and then let it rest for 5 minutes. It was tender, juicy, and beautifully charred on both sides, using a ridged grill pan on a gas-top stove. The other commenter is right: make extra sauce: it's so tasty you'll want more than this recipe yields.

Easy dinner dish to make, my family loved it, but also has the sophistication and flavor suitable for entertaining.

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