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Kung Pao Tofu

March/April 2008

Your rating: None Average: 3.7 (144 votes)

Tofu and lots of fresh vegetables are stir-fried in just a bit of oil in this traditional Chinese dish. In the Sichuan province of China where this dish originates, the tofu wouldn't be deep-fried like it is so often in America. Similarly, in our version of this takeout favorite we stir-fry the ingredients in only a little bit of oil.



READER'S COMMENT:
"It says oyster "flavored" sauce to make it vegetarian...in the tips and notes section... "
Kung Pao Tofu

25 Reviews for Kung Pao Tofu

09/23/2009
Anonymous

But to make it very good... we doubled the sauce recipe and served it over rice noodles. And the chile oil is not optional, that stuff really adds a bang.

Jessie, Madison, WI

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

Horrid. Kung pao should be nuclear hot so a real misnomer, the photo looks nice though. Blander than eating wallboard, if I ever had to eat that when I was starving. I even put 1/2 tsp of red pepper flakes in it to spice it up since we only had plain sesame oil and it was still bland: a real loser, skip it or add like a TBSP of red pepper flakes or some sechuan peppercorns.

Captyar, Bethesda, MD

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

As the two star rating denotes, this dish was just okay. Edible, certainly, but nothing that knocked anyone's socks off.

Judith, La Crescenta, CA

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

Made this tonight. We thought it was satisfying, but also rather bland. Wouldn't compare to restaurant Kung Pao, not nearly spicy enough.

Sandy, Seattle, WA

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

Hmm... I'm not sure where the Kung Pao comes from because it tastes nothing like the Kung Pao sauce you get at a Chinese restaurant. Usually Eating Well gets it right but I would say a big pass on this one if you are planning on making it. It's pretty boring.

Julie, Burlington, VT

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