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Korean Grilled Mackerel

July/August 2010

Your rating: None Average: 4.5 (10 votes)

Oily fish, such as mackerel, are strong-flavored and pair well with boldly seasoned glazes made from gochujang chile paste. The red, rich paste is so common in Korea that it is sold in virtually every supermarket in plastic containers ranging in size from about 2 cups to about 2 quarts. Normally the main ingredients are fermented soybeans ground with red chiles and powdered rice, plus a little salt and sweetener.



READER'S COMMENT:
"This dish was simple to make and delicious. I had a REALLY tough time finding the gochujang paste, even at an Asian supermarket (FYI - try looking for it in a tube if you don't see a tub). I'm glad I made the effort, though, because it...
Korean Grilled Mackerel

2 Reviews for Korean Grilled Mackerel

11/02/2013
Anonymous
Unlike anything else

My friend had caught loads of mackerels and I was looking for something different to cook with it. Loved the taste of this dish and found it quite different then anything else (although I am quite familiar with other Asian cuisines). Oh and unlike the person in the 1st review I no problem finding the paste in the Asian supermarket.

Unusual taste
Comments
09/05/2010

This dish was simple to make and delicious. I had a REALLY tough time finding the gochujang paste, even at an Asian supermarket (FYI - try looking for it in a tube if you don't see a tub). I'm glad I made the effort, though, because it has a great taste - pleasantly spicy but not so hot that you can't enjoy the flavor. I used trout, and it was great on the grill. Be sure to really oil the grill, though - I oiled mine fairly well and the fish still stuck a little bit and I had to loosen it up with a spatula. If you haven't eaten much trout before, trying to avoid the tiny bones is a bit annoying, but the finished product was so tasty that it made up for the extra work.

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