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Japanese Chicken-Scallion Rice Bowl

April/May 2005, The EatingWell Healthy in a Hurry Cookbook (2006)

Your rating: None Average: 3.9 (252 votes)

Here's the quintessence of Japanese home cooking: an aromatic, protein-rich broth served over rice. Admittedly, Japanese cooking leans heavily on sugar - for a less traditional taste, you could reduce or even omit the sugar.



READER'S COMMENT:
"I think it's great that everyone has adjusted the recipe to suit them but I just want to make a note. Traditionally, this dish is served more like a "rice bowl" than a soup. There is a balance between the topping and rice. The egg...
Japanese Chicken-Scallion Rice Bowl

51 Reviews for Japanese Chicken-Scallion Rice Bowl

01/30/2010
Anonymous

We liked this dish as is, but I suggest adding a splash of Sriracha sauce to give it a bit more flavor. My husband put a little bit of chopped pineapple in his and loved it.

Comments
01/20/2010

This was really yummy! I made it without mirin or wine and it was still super tastey! The scallions really add a nice flavor. I just had to cover the dish while the chicken cooked to make sure they cooked all the way through. I used more rice and it came out less like a soup, and more like fried rice, but it was awesome!

Comments
12/29/2009
Anonymous

Made this for the first time after thanksgiving with some leftover turkey indstead of chicken. My husband who is not a fan of asian foods at all asked for seconds and my two year old daughter ate it up!

Comments
12/20/2009
Anonymous

Made this for dinner lastnight...was super easy, really tasty & perfect for a cold Winter evening in Ohio! Emailing to a few friends to try!

Comments
09/07/2009
Anonymous

It was a wonderful soup...my cousin had made it for us for dinner... i enjoyed it and had to get the recipe..I couldn't believe how quick and easy it looks to make it.

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