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Hungarian Beef Goulash

January/February 2008

Your rating: None Average: 3.6 (499 votes)

This streamlined goulash skips the step of browning the beef, and instead coats it in a spice crust to give it a rich mahogany hue. This saucy dish is a natural served over whole-wheat egg noodles. Or, for something different, try prepared potato gnocchi or spaetzle.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Sounds good, but I've never had goulash with tomatos in it. Once upon a time had a wonderful recipe, but over the years it's disappeared, and since my memory is far from good I'm sure I'll make a beef soup. What I do remember is AT...

47 Reviews for Hungarian Beef Goulash

01/20/2010

Awesome!!
I don't really care if it's real goulash or not, I just care how it tastes. This is a delicious, filling meal I plan on eating again and again.

Comments
01/01/2010

I liked it. No it is not Real Goulash. But I don't think Eating Well is trying to copy the authentic Goulash. This is just a light healthy version.

Comments
10/29/2009
Anonymous

I live in Hungary... Hungarian goulash is thin, it is eaten as a soup... not over noodles. Hungarian Porkolt is with noodles... not goulash.
Therfore, don't overdo the cornstarch, as this is not supposed to be thick.

Comments
10/28/2009
Anonymous

The problem with this recipe, which would also explain the reader comment about the sauce being thin - is the lack of onions.

A good Hungarian Goulash with 2 lbs of beef should have at least 4-5 onions, if not more. Corn starch might make the sauce thicker, however, it's really the cooking time that makes the goulash goulash.

I will also have to agree with the critic of Worcestershire sauce - you shouldn't need anything other than some oil, salt/pepper (very optionally caraway seeds, I kind of dislike the idea) paprika powder, onions, and maybe a spoonful of tomato paste. Other than that, it's all water + time for cooking.

Comments (2)

16 comments

Anonymous wrote 1 year 39 weeks ago

I agree 100%, and so would my

I agree 100%, and so would my Hungarian parents and grandparents.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

It doesn't seem as many of

It doesn't seem as many of you are really that concerned with a low sodium diet. The use of many ingredients, CANNED tomatoes, Worchestershire sauce, Italian Seasoning, etc are all LOADED with salt.
I came here hoping to find recipes that I can use. I have to keep my salt below 1000 a day or I could die.
Sure was disapointed here :o(

10/07/2009
Anonymous

This was alright... as someone who really loves paprika, I think this could have used a couple more tablespoons (I use a nice Hungarian sweet paprika from Penzey's) Also, the sauce was thin, even after the addition of the cornstarch. Next time I'll double the cornstarch/water mixture before adding it to the crock-pot, so the sauce coats the noodles better. With some tweaks this will be a keeper.

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