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Holiday Sugar Cookies

December 1997

Your rating: None Average: 3.8 (12 votes)

These festive sugar cookies are proof that you can add whole-wheat flour to a baked good without anyone ever knowing it. We've replaced some of the butter with healthier canola oil, cutting the saturated fat by about 75%. They freeze well so you may want to consider making extras to have on hand for a sweet treat.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Came out really dry. More like the texture of a shortbread without the buttery taste. Maybe would be better with icing but that would defeat the purpose :-( "
Holiday Sugar Cookies

3 Reviews for Holiday Sugar Cookies

04/14/2012
Anonymous
My new favourite sugar cookie recipe

I have tried several sugar cookie recipes- healthy and not- looking for the right texture. I usually end up with a mix from the store. I hate that. I love to bake from scratch. My son always asks for blue sugar cookies. So I tried these thinking that if I'm going to make crappy sugar cookies, they might as well be healthier. Surprise, surprise! They were the best I've ever made. Not dry, but soft and chewy. I didn't have cake flour, so subbed all purpose, and added some blue food coloring. Maybe I slightly over shot the vanilla, but the dough was so moist, I didn't bother rolling it out. I just dropped the dough on the cookie sheet and flattened it out. They came out perfect, and I can't wait to make them again.

soft, delicious, easy
Comments
12/18/2011
Anonymous
Loved 'em

I'd for sure make these again. First try I used cracked whole wheat, but next time will use all white whole wheat flour (like, King Arthur All Purpose White Whole Wheat).

tasted like regular sugar cookies, rolled easily
Comments
12/12/2009
Anonymous

Came out really dry. More like the texture of a shortbread without the buttery taste. Maybe would be better with icing but that would defeat the purpose :-(

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