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Giardiniera

May/June 2014

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A quartet of garden vegetables—cauliflower, carrots, green beans and spring onions—plays a starring role in this best-of-summer, farmers’-market pickle recipe. Bright-green Castelvetrano olives from Sicily have a sweet, almost nutty flavor. Look for them in well-stocked supermarkets with other olives.


Giardiniera Recipe

Makes: About 12 cups

Serving Size: 1/2 cup

Active Time:

Total Time:

Equipment: 6 1-pint (2-cup) canning jars, canning equipment

Ingredients

  • 4 cups white-wine vinegar
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon pickling salt or fine sea salt (not iodized)
  • 12 cloves garlic, halved
  • 6 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
  • 5 cups small cauliflower florets
  • 3 stalks celery, sliced on the diagonal 1/4 inch thick
  • 3 small carrots, sliced on the diagonal 1/8 inch thick
  • 3 golf ball-size spring onion bulbs or boiling onions, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, sliced into 1/4-inch strips
  • 1 cup green bean pieces (2-inch)
  • 1 cup green Castelvetrano olives or other large green olives, pitted if desired
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil for serving

Preparation

  1. Before starting the recipe, gather the needed equipment (see Tips).
  2. Prepare 6 1-pint (2-cup) canning jars and lids: Wash in hot soapy water and rinse well. Place the rack in the pot and place the jars, right side up, on the rack. Add enough water to fill and cover the jars by at least 1 inch. Cover the pot and bring to a boil; boil, covered, for 10 minutes, then turn off the heat. Keep the jars in the hot water (with the pot covered) while you prepare the recipe.
  3. Meanwhile, place the new lids in a small saucepan, cover with water and bring to a gentle simmer. Very gently simmer for 10 minutes (taking care not to boil). Turn off the heat and keep the lids in the water until ready to use.
  4. Combine vinegar, water and salt in a large nonreactive saucepan (see Tips) and bring just to a boil. Stir until the salt is dissolved. Set aside.
  5. Remove the sterilized jars from the water and place on a clean towel (if they’re placed on a cold surface, the jars could crack). Place 4 garlic halves, 1 bay leaf and 1/2 tablespoon peppercorns in each jar.
  6. Toss cauliflower, celery, carrots, onions, bell pepper, green beans and olives in a large bowl. Pack the mixture into the prepared jars, leaving 1 inch of headspace. Fill the jars with the hot brine to within 1/2 inch of the rim. Wipe the rims with a clean cloth. Use a lid wand (or tongs) to remove the lids from the hot water. Place lids and dry rings on the jars. Tighten until just finger-tight (won’t move with gentle pressure) but don’t overtighten.
  7. To process the filled jars: Using a jar lifter, return jars to the pot with the warm water, placing them on the rack without touching one another or the sides of the pot. If the water does not cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches, add boiling water as needed. Cover the pot and bring to a boil; boil 10 minutes, then turn off the heat, uncover the pot and leave the jars in the water for 5 minutes. Use the jar lifter to transfer the jars to a towel, with some space between each jar. Let stand, without moving, for 24 hours. (If you do not want to process the jars in a boiling-water bath, you can refrigerate the pickled vegetables for up to 2 months.)
  8. After 24 hours, unscrew the rings and test the seals by pressing lightly on the center of each lid. They should have a slight concave indentation and neither yield to your pressure nor pop back. If a seal is not complete, you can process again in boiling water or store any unsealed jars in the refrigerator.
  9. To serve: When you open the jar, add 1 tablespoon oil to the top. As you remove the vegetables, they’ll be coated with a little oil, which will temper their acidity. Refrigerate after opening.

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Store at room temperature for up to 1 year if processed in a water bath.
  • For this recipe, you will need the following canning equipment: 6 1-pint (2-cup) canning jars with rings and new lids; a canning pot with a rack or a large pot plus a heatproof rack that fits into the bottom of the pot; jar lifter; lid wand or tongs to help remove lids from hot water; and a clean cloth to wipe the jar rims. Canning equipment is available in hardware stores and at canning pantry.com (complete kits $43-$75).
  • Be sure to use a nonreactive pan, baking dish or bowl—stainless-steel, enamel-coated or glass—when cooking with acidic food (citrus, cranberries, tomatoes) to prevent the food from reacting with the pan. Reactive pans, such as aluminum and cast-iron, can impart off colors and/or flavors.

Nutrition

Per serving: 57 calories; 5 g fat (1 g sat, 3 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 3 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 1 g total sugars; 1 g protein; 1 g fiber; 90 mg sodium; 131 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (32% daily value), Vitamin A (25% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 0

Exchanges: 1/2 vegetable, 1 fat



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Recipe Categories

Preparation/ Technique
Marinate/Rub
Preserve
Season
Spring
Summer
Ethnic/Regional
Italian
Ease of Preparation
Easy
Total Time
More than 1 hour
Servings
8 or more
Publication
May/June 2014

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