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Fresh Fruit Butter

May/June 2009

Your rating: None Average: 4.6 (11 votes)

Fruit butter are made by cooking down the fruit mixture until thick and sticky instead of adding pectin to set the mixture as you do with jam. Spread on whole-grain toast or stir into plain yogurt. Butters are supposed to be smooth and well, buttery, so we prefer to peel stone fruit, such as apricots, nectarines, peaches, and apples and pears. If you're making a butter with “seedy” berries, such as blackberries, raspberries or even blueberries, you can puree the butter and pass it through a sieve for the smoothest result. Try the combination of blueberries with lime juice and zest or plums with orange juice and zest.



READER'S COMMENT:
"This is such a simple recipe and the end result is incredible. I have made this recipe with brown sugar, raw sugar, honey, and Agave--when using agave: use only 1/2 to 1/4 cups otherwise it is HORRIBLY sweet, in the process of the...
Fresh Fruit Butter Recipe

2 Reviews for Fresh Fruit Butter

10/10/2011
Delicious!

This is a fantastic recipe. I doubled the recipe, used 1/2 cup dark brown sugar and 1/2 cup Sugar in the Raw, and added about 1/2 tsp of Apple Pie Spice. Because there were a lot more apples, it took significantly longer to cook down. About an hour-thirty to an hour-forty-five. After it cooled a bit, I ran it through a food mill since it was still chunky. It came out so silky smooth and the flavor is great - my husband loves it! I portioned it out into half-pint jars and froze them so we'll have it all winter!

Easy, tastes great, made more than expected
Comments
08/10/2010
Anonymous

This is such a simple recipe and the end result is incredible. I have made this recipe with brown sugar, raw sugar, honey, and Agave--when using agave: use only 1/2 to 1/4 cups otherwise it is HORRIBLY sweet, in the process of the reduction the agave gets reduced as well to a very condensed state. Personally I prefer the raw sugar and honey to sweeten the fruit, it gives a mellower sweetness which enhances the fruit over an obvious sweetness which the other sugars give.

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