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Escarole & White Bean Soup

October/November 2005, The EatingWell Healthy in a Hurry Cookbook (2006)

Your rating: None Average: 3.8 (83 votes)

Don't be afraid of escarole, which looks like slightly frilly romaine lettuce, because it cooks down into a sweet and tender green. If you can't find it, substitute a 10-ounce bag of spinach. Make It a Meal: Warm crusty bread and a green salad make an excellent accompaniment.



READER'S COMMENT:
"We couldn't find escarole at the time, so we ended up using kale. You do need to cut the kale up into much smaller pieces, but it worked out great and some of us like it better than the escarole. "
Escarole & White Bean Soup

6 Reviews for Escarole & White Bean Soup

12/31/2012
Anonymous
Great way to eat your veggies

Super easy and very flavorful. Agree with others you can play around with different veggies. Save yourself the fat and calories...you absolutely don't need that much oil!!!!!

Easy, flavorful
Comments
09/20/2010
Anonymous

We couldn't find escarole at the time, so we ended up using kale. You do need to cut the kale up into much smaller pieces, but it worked out great and some of us like it better than the escarole.

Comments
06/09/2010

This dish was delicious! Being vegetarian, this works well without ANY substitutions! My entire meat eating family loved this one too! The escarole is like a nice combination of spinach and cabbage! I will definitely make this again. Super quick and very easy for anyone's busy days!

Comments
01/30/2010

I used 2 cans of Muir Glen Fire Roasted Tomatoes, mainly because the grape tomatoes I had weren't as fresh as I would have liked. I think without comparison this was a beneficial substitution. Being single I now have 5/6 meals from this recipe and will freeze them for later especially lunches.

Comments
12/28/2009
Anonymous

We added 14 oz more broth and some chorizo sausage. Great dish and easy to make

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