Advertisement

EatingWell Power Salad

March/April 2007, The EatingWell Diet (2007)

Your rating: None Average: 4 (94 votes)

Here's our take on a traditional chef's salad, which is anything but light fare when it's heaped with meats and cheeses. Our version keeps the satisfaction factor with lean turkey breast and reduced-fat Swiss cheese - and adds plenty of colorful vegetables to the mix.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Uhm duh, it's a chef salad with the meat included, you don't need any additional food after eating this. Sodium is controlled through the meats, cheeses, and dressing. "
EatingWell Power Salad

4 Reviews for EatingWell Power Salad

06/07/2014

This recipe goes in the keeper file. Packs great for lunch. My first attempt at a homemade creamy dressing, and I loved it. Love making homemade dressings over using store bought.

Comments
08/23/2010
Anonymous

Uhm duh, it's a chef salad with the meat included, you don't need any additional food after eating this.

Sodium is controlled through the meats, cheeses, and dressing.

Comments (1)

3 comments

Anonymous wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

A Chef's Salad is usually

A Chef's Salad is usually meant as a meal in itself. Its not like a side salad, or dinner salad, you'd eat before the main course. As for the dressing, you can always add more to your taste, just factor that into the calorie count!

08/14/2010
Anonymous

This salad has way too much lettuce and not nearly enough dressing. Also, it's either too bulky or too low in calories. By the time you fill up on all that lettuce, you don't have sufficient room left over to eat even a small meal.

Comments (1)

3 comments

Anonymous wrote 1 year 39 weeks ago

Pitch a few croutons on the

Pitch a few croutons on the top. BINGO...a complete meal.

07/29/2010
Anonymous

I hope, and assume, that most of the sodium content is due to the dressing...that can always be adjusted.

Comments

Fields marked with * are required

Rate This*

Review Title

Tip: Use adjectives to help get your point across.

Pros

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Cons

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Description*

Tip: Pretend you're on the debate team and make your point.

Attach a photo

Photo Caption

If you attach a photo, please enter a caption to go with it.

Would you recommend this recipe?

Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner