Advertisement

Cider-Glazed Roots with Cinnamon Walnuts

November/December 2008

Your rating: None Average: 3.6 (48 votes)

Here we roast a variety of roots with a brown sugar-cider glaze. Make them instead of candied sweet potatoes at your Thanksgiving celebration. If you include red beets, the whole dish will take on a gorgeous ruby hue.


Cider-Glazed Roots with Cinnamon Walnuts

3 Reviews for Cider-Glazed Roots with Cinnamon Walnuts

12/26/2013
Delicious

I made this with carrots and turnips, and it came out wonderful. The people in my party did not even recognize them as turnips, they were so sweet. Will definitely make again.

healthy, delicious
Comments
11/02/2012
Anonymous
Nice addition to my crockpot method of cooking root veggies!

Instead of baking this in the oven I put the vegetables and cider ingredients in my slow cooker on low for about 8 hours. (I did stir it a few times during the day) It came out awesome, and I didn't need to use up any of my precious oven space.

Comments
11/23/2011
Anonymous
Pleasantly surprised!

Turnips are not people's favorite food, but this recipe is magic. I got a bunch of turnips from my local CSA and tried this recipe out along with a bag of baby carrots - pretty much to use up the veggies I had in the fridge. I reduced the butter (I used a tsp of Earth Balance) doubled the cinnamon and it was fantastic. I only had apple juice (not cider) and it worked just fine.

flavor
Comments (1)

No comments

Anonymous wrote 2 years 2 weeks ago

Pure Heaven! I have made

Pure Heaven! I have made this recipe a number of times with different root vegetables and it always turns out fantastic. The sweetness is just right and the glaze is perfect for just about every fall vegetables. Parsnips are the best suited in my opinion (but skip regular white potatoes). It is simple to make and great for inclement weather when we will be stuck in the house anyway.

Fields marked with * are required

Rate This*

Review Title

Tip: Use adjectives to help get your point across.

Pros

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Cons

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Description*

Tip: Pretend you're on the debate team and make your point.

Attach a photo

Photo Caption

If you attach a photo, please enter a caption to go with it.

Would you recommend this recipe?

Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner