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"Use a Spoon" Chopped Salad

November/December 2011

Your rating: None Average: 3.7 (108 votes)

When Paul Newman and Michel Nischan opened their Westport, Connecticut, restaurant Dressing Room, Paul’s request was that the menu always include a chopped salad that you could eat with a spoon. This chopped salad recipe is full of great flavors, colors and textures, featuring celery, carrots, red pepper, apple, cucumber, greens, cabbage, goat cheese and almonds. This is great for any holiday meal: you can let it stand and it stays crisp.


"Use a Spoon" Chopped Salad Recipe

7 Reviews for "Use a Spoon" Chopped Salad

11/19/2011
Anonymous
Question

Hi! Stupid question alert...is "crumbled goat cheese" different from the soft goat cheese that we buy wrapped in plastic - kind of sausage-like? Appreciate any insight - thanks!

Comments (2)

No comments

Anonymous wrote 51 weeks 5 days ago

Look for "Feta" cheese. You

Look for "Feta" cheese. You can buy either a small block or crumbled.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 4 weeks ago

i'd say yes its different -

i'd say yes its different - soft goat cheese is soft and spreadable - crumbled is harder - you could also buy goat cheese feta - in a block that comes in a container submerged in brine and crumble your own - instead of buying the pre-crumbled kind

11/12/2011
Anonymous
A salad I can get excited about

I am not the greatest at knife skills, but this salad is not hard to make, just a little time consuming. My dinner guests did seem to feel like it was worth the work. Because it was a dinner party, I added a little extra cheese. I am not sure the nuts were necessary, and I would probably sub walnuts or pecans next time I make it. Overall, an excellent chopped salad without all the normal meaty and cured additions. I didn't even really miss that stuff! If you're into a chopped salad, this is a solid recipe. Makes a lot, so be ready to share!

Great flavor
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