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Brothy Chinese Noodles

January/February 2010

Your rating: None Average: 4.2 (140 votes)

This dish was inspired by Chinese Dan Dan noodles—ground pork and noodles in a spicy broth. We use ground turkey and omit the traditional Sichuan peppercorns for convenience, but add hot sesame oil. Use toasted sesame oil instead if you want mild noodles.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Love this dish! This is one that we always agree on. Have made it several times, and it always turns out great. Didn't have hot sesame oil but used regular with some red pepper flakes sprinkled in. (I always add more when serving myself!...
Brothy Chinese Noodles Recipe

28 Reviews for Brothy Chinese Noodles

01/15/2010

My kids liked this too. I too used chili paste and sesame oil instead of hot sesame oil, and the flatbreads were worth the effort. I added sriracha sauce to my bowl for extra kick.

Comments
01/11/2010
Anonymous

This was a hit with the whole family and very easy. Much tastier than I expected, given the short ingredient list. I used some hot oil and some toast sesame oil to insure it would not be too spicy. Next time I will add just a bit more ginger.

Comments
01/08/2010

I made these noodles for my beautiful wife last night and they were EXCELLENT! I also made (as suggested) the Scallion Flat Breads and it was and outstanding combination. I did make one small change: I could not find hot sesame oil so I flavored 1 tablespoon of canola oil with 1 teaspoon Sambal Oleck chili paste to cook the turkey, scallion, etc. mixture and I added 1 teaspoon of Sun Luck chili oil to the broth, bok choy, noodle mixture. The spiciness was perfect even for my wife who does not like hot foods. The Sambal added some little red flecks to spice up the look. Next time I will add a little more ginger to bring out that flavor. Thanks EW kitchen folks, you have a keeper here! I can't wait to try the flat breads with some hummus.

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