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Bev's Chocolate Chip Cookies

Spring 2004, The Essential EatingWell Cookbook (2004), July/August 2012

Your rating: None Average: 4 (1249 votes)

EatingWell reader Beverley Sharpe of California contributed this recipe. She updated a favorite treat by cutting back on sugar and incorporating whole grains. To increase protein, she replaces the rolled oats with 1 cup almond meal.



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175 Reviews for Bev's Chocolate Chip Cookies

10/18/2009

What a great recipe. I made them for my kids who tolerate healthy food way better than my husband, and he even liked them. I substituted the almond meal for the oat flour and they have a wonderful taste and texture. I did chill the dough (after putting them on the baking sheet) for a few minutes so they wouldn't flatten too much in the oven and baked them for only 10 minutes. They look beautiful and taste great! Thanks!!

Comments
10/10/2009

Our standard choc chip cookies from now on. The kids love them. I prefer the almond meal variation, as the combination with whole wheat pastry flour (which we use in place of all-purpose in most of our baking) gives the cookie a terrific flavor. Will try the bittersweet choc chips to tone down the sweetness a bit.

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

I love that they have whole-wheat flour in them. It makes them much more filling. They have a just the right amount of sweetness. I used all purpous flour instead of the ground oats and it works just as well.

Comments
09/23/2009

Awesome recipe! So delicious! Even picky cousin loved them. I think these will replace our standard Chocolate Chip Cookies for a while. Thanks for the recipe Bev!

Comments
09/21/2009
Anonymous

Wow I am impressed that these stray so much from traditional chocolate chip cookies and yet taste so similar. No one would ever notice that these were not full fat, white flour cookies unless you told them. Definitely a recipe I will make again.

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