Acorn Squash Stuffed with Chard & White Beans

31 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine November/December 2009

Acorn squash's natural shape makes it just right for stuffing. This filling has Mediterranean flair: olives, tomato paste, white beans and Parmesan cheese. Serve with: Mixed green salad with radicchio and red onion and crisp white wine, such as Pinot Grigio.

Ingredients 4 servings

for serving adjustment
Serving size has been adjusted!
Original recipe yields 4 servings
US
Metric
Nutrition per serving may change if servings are adjusted.
  • 2 medium acorn squash, halved (see Tip) and seeded
  • 1 teaspoon plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, divided
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 8 cups chopped chard leaves (about 1 large bunch chard)
  • 1 15-ounce can white beans, rinsed
  • 1/4 cup chopped kalamata olives
  • 1/3 cup coarse dry whole-wheat breadcrumbs (see Note)
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation

  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. Cut a small slice off the bottom of each squash half so it rests flat. Brush the insides with 1 teaspoon oil; sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Place in a 9-by-13-inch (or similar-size) microwave-safe dish. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave on High until the squash is fork-tender, about 12 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion; cook, stirring, until starting to brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Add garlic; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in water, tomato paste and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Stir in chard, cover and cook until tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in white beans and olives; cook until heated through, 1 to 2 minutes more. Remove from the heat.
  3. Position rack in center of oven; preheat broiler.
  4. Combine breadcrumbs, Parmesan and the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a bowl. Fill each squash half with about 1 cup of the chard mixture. Place in a baking pan or on a baking sheet. Sprinkle with the breadcrumb mixture. Broil in the center of the oven until the breadcrumbs are browned, 1 to 2 minutes.
  • Tip: Make it easier to cut a pumpkin, acorn squash or other winter squash: pierce in several places with a fork; microwave on High for 45 to 60 seconds. Use a large sharp knife to cut in half. Remove the seeds and stringy fibers with a spoon.
  • Ingredient Note: We like Ian's brand of coarse dry whole-wheat breadcrumbs, labeled “Panko breadcrumbs.” Find them in the natural-foods section of large supermarkets. To make your own breadcrumbs, trim crusts from firm sandwich bread. Tear the bread into pieces and process in a food processor until coarse crumbs form. Spread on a baking sheet and bake at 250°F until dry, about 15 minutes. One slice of bread makes about 1/3 cup dry breadcrumbs.
  • Cut Down on Dishes: A rimmed baking sheet is great for everything from roasting to catching accidental drips and spills. For effortless cleanup and to keep your baking sheets in tip-top shape, line them with a layer of foil before each use.

Nutrition information

  • Per serving: 341 calories; 13 g fat(2 g sat); 12 g fiber; 50 g carbohydrates; 10 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 6 mg cholesterol; 8 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 4937 IU vitamin A; 38 mg vitamin C; 177 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 684 mg sodium; 1159 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (100% daily value), Vitamin C (60% dv), Magnesium & Potassium (33% dv), Folate (29% dv), Iron (20% dv)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 3
  • Exchanges: 3 starch, 1 vegetable, 1/2 plant-based protein, 2 fat

Reviews 31

February 09, 2016
profile image
By: EatingWell User
Delicious! Absolutely delicious! I used butter beans and beet greens because that is what I had in the fridge and added some Italian spices. This will be a recipe I make again and again. Pros: Extremely easy. Loved the tips for cooking the squash.
November 10, 2013
profile image
By: EatingWell User
Scrumptious and simple to prepare The saltiness of the kalamata olives, the creaminess of the beans, and the sweetness of the squash combine to make an absolutely incredible dinner. Instead of microwaving the squash, I roasted it cut-side down, with no oil brushed on top, which saves some calories. I used chickpeas and spinach because they were what I had on hand. It turned out scrumptious -- a perfect late-Fall meal! Pros: Easy, filling, delicious, fancy enough for company
January 08, 2013
profile image
By: EatingWell User
Never microwave anything wrapped in plastic Never microwave anything wrapped in plastic. The chemical components in the plastic sheets leach under high heat and end up in food. You are hearing this from a Ph.D. Chemist. So, believe it!
November 10, 2012
profile image
By: EatingWell User
Delicious and Impressive I thought this was an amazing dish. I was able to put it together and get it on the table within an hour...perfect for a Friday night with friends. I roasted the dish rather than the 2 minute broil at the end. I made very minor adjustments to the ingredients just because of our taste preferences...I used sundried tomato paste and substituted vermouth for the water as tomatoes have those alcohol soluable favors that you can only get by adding alcohol...and they shouldn't be ignored. Also I added about 15-20 cherry tomatoes and a 1/2 tsp poultry seasoning to the skillet. I used Romano cheese as I feel it delivers a more earthy flavor to the end result. I served this with an Australian Shiraz. It's comfort food at it's best. Will absolutely make again. Pros: Easy
October 06, 2012
profile image
By: EatingWell User
A dinner all into itself... Bake acorn squash in a dish with 1/4 water brush with butter to keep moist. Add chard combo at end, I eliminated breadcrumbs & parm cheese (why add the calories?) this was a meal. I served with a salmon steak for my husband. Pros: Fills the stomach and satisfies the palate with the variations of flavors Cons: I would bake the squash instead of microwaving...had more success that way to insure it being cooked
May 24, 2012
profile image
By: aabrian
Good start but could be improved This is good as presented but I think it could be livened up a bit by giving the bean, chard mix a good squeeze of lemon and adding some herbs like thyme, marjoram, or oregano. Pine nuts seem like a natural addition to this, and dried tomatoes could replace the olives for a different flavor. Pros: healthy, attractive, easy
May 27, 2011
profile image
By: sarawright26
Thanksgiving Staple Instead of turkey, I made this for myself on Thanksgiving. It was delicious, however, I used spinach instead of chard because of personal preference. I also omitted the cheese, breadcrumbs, and olives. Although I left out a few ingredients, this turned out delicious. I loved the texture of the white beans. I would definitely make this again.
February 17, 2011
profile image
By: noellabee
Great Recipe Love this recipe. I changed it of course to whatever I had in my kitchen and have made several variations. I've used kidney beans with spinach and bell peppers and have made a Mediterranean version with feta, kalamata olives and ground beef or lamb. I traditionally serve this alongside a salad and a glass of wine. Very filling! Pros: Versatile, Healthy, Filling
January 29, 2011
profile image
By: wonderdogg44
Great! I baked the squash in the oven, substituted 4 tb of whole crushed tomatoes for the water and tomato paste, and used red kidney beans. Came out delicious!