Roasted Pumpkin-Apple Soup

22 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine November/December 2009

Apples add just a hint of sweetness to this velvety pumpkin soup. Try it as a delightful first course for a special meal.

Ingredients 12 servings

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Original recipe yields 12 servings
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  • 4 pounds pie pumpkin or butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 2-inch chunks (see Tip)
  • 4 large sweet-tart apples, such as Empire, Cameo or Braeburn, unpeeled, cored and cut into eighths
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
  • 6 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 1/3 cup chopped hazelnuts, toasted (see Tip)
  • 2 tablespoons hazelnut oil

Preparation

  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. Preheat oven to 450 °F.
  2. Toss pumpkin (or squash), apples, olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper in a large bowl. Spread evenly on a large rimmed baking sheet. Roast, stirring once, for 30 minutes. Stir in sage and continue roasting until very tender and starting to brown, 15 to 20 minutes more.
  3. Transfer about one-third of the pumpkin (or squash) and apples to a blender along with 2 cups broth. Puree until smooth. Transfer to a Dutch oven and repeat for two more batches. Season with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and heat through over medium-low heat, stirring constantly to prevent splattering, for about 6 minutes. Serve each portion topped with hazelnuts and a drizzle of hazelnut oil.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days. Reheat in the microwave on High, covered, stirring frequently, or on the stovetop over medium heat.
  • Tips: Make it easier to cut a pumpkin, acorn squash or other winter squash: pierce in several places with a fork; microwave on High for 45 to 60 seconds. Use a large sharp knife to cut in half. Remove the seeds and stringy fibers with a spoon.
  • To toast chopped nuts, small nuts and seeds, place in a small dry skillet and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until fragrant and lightly browned, 2 to 4 minutes.
  • Cut Down on Dishes: A rimmed baking sheet is great for everything from roasting to catching accidental drips and spills. For effortless cleanup and to keep your baking sheets in tip-top shape, line them with a layer of foil before each use.

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: about 1 cup
  • Per serving: 180 calories; 9 g fat(1 g sat); 6 g fiber; 25 g carbohydrates; 3 g protein; 34 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 11 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 14381 IU vitamin A; 24 mg vitamin C; 62 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 525 mg sodium; 570 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (290% daily value), Vitamin C (40% dv), Potassium (16% dv)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 1 1/2
  • Exchanges: 1 starch, 1/2 fruit, 2 fat

Reviews 22

November 29, 2014
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By: doc.mindy
bland This was just a bland soup. I can't tell if it needed more sage, more spices, or maybe some cream? Have had other pumpkin / squash soup and loved it, but this tasted sort of like unseasoned pureed squash. I wasn't terrible, but it certainly wasn't anything special. Pros: healthy Cons: didn't taste great
September 25, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Switched it up for ease. I cheated and used canned pumpkin for a quick weeknight dinner and threw it and the apples together in the pot with an onion to cook. Used an immersion blender and it turned out good. Also didn't have hazelnuts, but the sage really added a nice flavor. I'd like to roast it all fresh when I have more time.
May 30, 2012
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By: EatingWell User
A new favourite I made this soup for a progressive dinner party, some weeks ago, and must say that it was an absolute hit ! I was badgered for the duration of the night by nosy neighbours trying to wheedle the recipe out of me. This is definitely going in to the recipe book!! Pros: Hearty, filling Cons: None to my knowledge
January 02, 2012
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By: EatingWell User
Easier prep/tips There is no need to peel squash before roasting. Using a large sharp butcher knife, cut into 1/2 or 1/4's or what ever (depending on the size you are starting with) Then place meat side down on a cookie sheet and roast at 400 until a fork can pierce the skin easily. (higher heat can cause bitterness if it gets burnt) Let cool until you can handle (or even in the fridge over night). The skin comes right off and if there are any burnt edges you can easily cut them off the larger pieces. I personally sauted the apple pieces on the stove with a bit of unsalted butter and the spices and then did the blending. I used several small uncarved carving pumkins from Halloween which aren't usually too flavorfull but they were just right. Pros: easy, tasty very good for you!
January 02, 2012
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By: EatingWell User
No need to peel squash before roasting... There is no need to peel squash before roasting. Using a large sharp butcher knife, cut into 1/2 or 1/4's or what ever (depending on the size you are starting with) Then place meat side down on a cookie sheet and roast at 400 until a fork can pierce the skin easily. (higher heat can cause bitterness if it gets burnt) Let cool until you can handle (or even in the fridge over night). The skin comes right off and if there are any burnt edges you can easily cut them off the larger pieces. I personally sauted the apple pieces on the stove with a bit of unsalted butter and the spices and then did the blending. I used several small uncarved carving pumkins from Halloween which aren't usually too flavorfull but they were just right.
December 07, 2011
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By: EatingWell User
This is listed as gluten-free, but not all chicken stocks are GF. If this is a consideration for someone you'll be sharing this soup with, be sure to read the labels.
November 27, 2010
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By: aabrian
The taste was a little bitter, but was definitely softened by the hazelnuts and oil. I found the oven temperature in the recipe to be too high. The pumpkin got burned spots on it fairly quickly. Also, the apple takes much less time to roast than the pumpkin. Maybe it should added along with the sage to give the pumpkin a head start. Perhaps peeling the apples would get rid of some of the bitterness.
October 19, 2010
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By: EatingWell User
A coworker made this soup and I was the lucky recipient of an amazing bowlful!. I actually couldn't wait for lunch so I had it for breakfast. This is the perfect soup for a chilly Fall day.
October 10, 2010
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By: EatingWell User
This soup was so good last year that I grew pie pumpkins this year to make this soup again.