Recipe Image

Apricot Grunt

  • 20 m
  • 1 h
Marie Simmons
“Grunts, also known as slumps, are cousins to the cobbler—they too feature a biscuit topping, but unlike the cobbler, which is baked in the oven, a grunt is cooked on the stovetop. In this easy summertime dessert, apricots simmer in a skillet with honey and a touch of cloves. Then whole-grain buttermilk biscuits are steamed on top of the bubbling fruit until set. Serve warm with a little heavy cream, a dollop of yogurt or vanilla ice cream. Try it with any type of fruit or combination of fruit—frozen fruit works well too.”

Ingredients

    • Filling
    • 6 cups sliced ripe apricots, nectarines or peaches ( ½-inch slices), peeled if desired, fresh or frozen
    • ⅓ cup honey
    • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
    • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
    • Topping
    • ½ cup white whole-wheat flour (see Note)
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • ½ teaspoon baking powder
    • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
    • ¼ teaspoon salt
    • ¼ cup buttermilk
    • 1 tablespoon canola oil
    • 1 teaspoon sugar mixed with ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

  • 1 To prepare filling: Combine apricots (or nectarines or peaches), honey, lemon juice and cloves in a 10-inch nonreactive skillet (see Tip) with a lid. Bring to a boil, uncovered, stirring frequently. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer and cook, uncovered, until starting to soften, about 5 minutes.
  • 2 To prepare topping: Whisk flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl. Whisk buttermilk and oil in a measuring cup. Gradually drizzle the buttermilk mixture over the dry ingredients, tossing with a fork just until evenly moistened.
  • 3 Drop 6 equal portions of batter (about 1 generous tablespoon each) onto the surface of the bubbling fruit. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.
  • 4 Cover the skillet and cook for 15 minutes without lifting the lid. If the biscuits are not set, replace the lid and cook until set, about 5 minutes more. The biscuits should be puffed and firm to the touch. Let cool, uncovered, for about 20 minutes before serving.
  • Note: White whole-wheat flour, made from a special variety of white wheat, is light in color and flavor but has the same nutritional properties as regular whole-wheat flour. It is available at large supermarkets and natural-foods stores and online. Store it in the freezer.
  • Tip: A nonreactive pan—stainless-steel, enamel-coated or glass—is necessary when cooking with acidic foods, such as lemon, to prevent the food from reacting with the pan. Reactive pans, such as aluminum and cast-iron, can impart off colors and/or flavors.
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