Vegetable Satay

Vegetable Satay

2 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine November/December 2007

Although usually made with strips of chicken or beef, this Indonesian-style satay can be made with fresh broccoli and cauliflower florets. Hot Madras curry has a bit of a kick; use regular curry powder if you just want the flavor of curry but not the heat. To save time, look for broccoli and cauliflower already cut into florets in the produce section or at the salad bar of your supermarket.

Ingredients 1 serving

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  • 24 broccoli florets, (about 10 ounces)
  • 24 cauliflower florets (about 10 ounces)
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger, or ginger juice (see Note)
  • 1 tablespoon smooth natural peanut butter
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon hot Madras curry powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt


  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil over high heat. Add broccoli and cauliflower; cook until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes. Drain; rinse under cool water.
  2. Whisk soy sauce, vinegar, oil, ginger (or ginger juice), peanut butter, garlic, curry and salt in a large bowl until smooth. Add the florets; gently toss to coat. Let marinate at room temperature for at least 2 hours or cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day.
  3. To serve, thread 2 broccoli and 2 cauliflower florets onto each skewer. (Reserve marinade.) Arrange the skewers on a platter in a single layer and drizzle with the marinade.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 2, cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day.
  • Equipment: 12 skewers
  • Note: We use bottled ginger juice (pressed gingerroot) to add the taste of fresh ginger without the work of mincing or grating. Use it to flavor drinks, stir-fries, marinades or anywhere you'd use fresh ginger. Find it in specialty stores or online at
  • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: 1 skewer
  • Per serving: 33 calories; 2 g fat(0 g sat); 1 g fiber; 3 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 30 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 709 IU vitamin A; 34 mg vitamin C; 18 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 111 mg sodium; 155 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (50% daily value)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 0
  • Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 1 fat

Reviews 2

July 15, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Pretty Darned Good I was mildly surprised, especially after the first review. Actually came out really good and tasty. If you don't drain the broccoli and cauliflower WELL after you cook it, I could see how that might water down the flavor but mine came out really tasty and I even reduced the salt by half. Other half really liked it too. I used Chinese sesame oil which is more flavorful than some of the health food 'sesame oils'. I also used Sun Brand Madras Curry Powder and real ginger minced (not the juice). Those are the only things I can think of that would make it bland but mine was not bland at all. Did not skewer. Will make it again. Pros: I had all the ingredients
June 15, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Veggies and peanut butter seems like a good idea, but it comes out bland and boring. This also ran through me like Mexican water does to an American. Avoid this at all costs. Pros: None Cons: To many to list