This streamlined goulash skips the step of browning the beef, and instead coats it in a spice crust to give it a rich mahogany hue. This saucy dish is a natural served over whole-wheat egg noodles. Or, for something different, try prepared potato gnocchi or spaetzle.

Patsy Jamieson
Source: EatingWell Magazine, January/February 2008
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Place beef in a 4-quart or larger slow cooker. Crush caraway seeds with the bottom of a saucepan. Transfer to a small bowl and stir in paprika, salt and pepper. Sprinkle the beef with the spice mixture and toss to coat well. Top with onion and bell pepper.

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  • Combine tomatoes, broth, Worcestershire sauce and garlic in a medium saucepan; bring to a simmer. Pour over the beef and vegetables. Place bay leaves on top. Cover and cook until

  • the beef is very tender, 4 to 4 1/2 hours on high or 7 to 7 1/2 hours on low.

  • Discard the bay leaves; skim or blot any visible fat from the surface of the stew. Add the cornstarch mixture to the stew and cook on high, stirring 2 or 3 times, until slightly thickened, 10 to 15 minutes. Serve sprinkled with parsley.

Tips

Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days or freeze for up to 4 months. | Prep ahead: Trim beef and coat with spice mixture. Prepare vegetables. Combine tomatoes, broth, Worcestershire sauce and garlic. Refrigerate in separate covered containers for up to 1

Ingredient Note: Paprika specifically labeled as “Hungarian” is worth seeking out for this dish because it delivers a fuller, richer flavor than regular or Spanish paprika. Find it at specialty-foods store or online at HungarianDeli.com and penzeys.com.

For easy cleanup, try a slow-cooker liner. These heat-resistant, disposable liners fit neatly inside the insert and help prevent food from sticking to the bottom and sides of your slow cooker.

Nutrition Facts

168 calories; protein 23.3g 47% DV; carbohydrates 6.2g 2% DV; exchange other carbs 0.5; dietary fiber 1.1g 5% DV; sugars 3g; fat 4.8g 7% DV; saturated fat 1.8g 9% DV; cholesterol 67.2mg 22% DV; vitamin a iu 1332.8IU 27% DV; vitamin c 22.7mg 38% DV; folate 17mcg 4% DV; calcium 28.7mg 3% DV; iron 2.4mg 13% DV; magnesium 19.6mg 7% DV; potassium 273.3mg 8% DV; sodium 338mg 14% DV; thiamin 0.1mg 6% DV.

Reviews (51)

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51 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 3
  • 4 star values: 29
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 10
  • 1 star values: 6
Rating: 4 stars
10/30/2011
I thought it was very tasty regardless of it's resemblance to true goulash. It took a bit more than the recommended amount of corn starch to thicken it up to my liking. I also added a bit of fat free sour cream to my plate. I suppose that's more like a paprikash or a stroganoff but I thought it added a bit of something nice to the flavor and the texture. Read More
Rating: 4 stars
10/30/2011
The smell of this dish met us as we walked through the back door...yummmmm. We enjoyed it with a loaf of crusty bread salad and a glass of merlot. My husband was quick to comment "this is a keeper". Read More
Rating: 4 stars
10/29/2011
Very Close to my recipe I have been making a version of Hungarian goulash for many years and it is still one of my family's favorites. This comes close becasue it uses some of the critical ingredients that give it that special taste. Caraway and the hot and sweet Hungarina papkikas are a must and should not be left out or substituted. That's what gives it such a spicy yet sweet kick. I also add a few pickled hot cherry peppers since my family likes it spicy! Pros: Much quicker to make but a little less beef flavor. Read More
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Rating: 2 stars
07/24/2015
Gulyas was originally made by the shepherds when attending their flocks. It is a simple dish so they would not have had Worcestershire sauce nor any of the other variants you have added to this recipe including tomatoes. Hungarian cooks do not add tomatoes to any of their recipes! Good quality Hungarian paprika is most important and a lot of it - about 1/4 cup along with some salt and pepper and of course caraway seeds (another standard in Hungarian cooking) - that is it. I do not understand this penchant of adding tomatoes or tomato paste to everything. A big no no if you want traditional Hungarian cooking. Read More
Rating: 4 stars
10/29/2011
Delicious I personally don't care if this isn't "authentic" Hungarian goulash it is still a delicious meal. However it was way too soupy. The cornstarch mixture didn't thicken up the sauce at all so we ended up just using a slotted spoon to serve with to avoid getting too much liquid and not enough meat. I also used a yellow pepper because that's what I had on hand. Next time I make this I'm not even going to bother adding the can of beef broth; I don't really think it adds anything extra to the meal other than liquid and seeing how much liquid we had leftover it's just a waste of broth. Pros: Filling hearty but light on calories Cons: Too soupy Read More
Rating: 4 stars
10/30/2011
Worcestershire sauce is never used in gulyas. Where in Hungary has that been used. Read More
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Rating: 4 stars
12/19/2011
Very good but with a few changes! I also found this 'goulash' too thin for my liking so when it done I added instant potato flakes and it thickened nicely. Just kept adding until it seemed right. Wonderful flavours! Read More
Rating: 2 stars
09/26/2012
This isnt Hungarian goulash I'm Hungarian & this isn't real Hungarian goulash at all. Real Hungarian gulyas is more like a soupy beef stew. No tomatoes & never ever noodles! It's a very simple soup/stew with beef & potatoes. No other veggies except for the onion base. It's often served with a nice hearty rye. Pros: good flavor Cons: needs more salt & pepper Read More
Rating: 2 stars
01/15/2012
Not that good not that good which pains me because i love goulash and Eating Well.. but this recipe fails.. sorry.. Pros: Meat is tender at the end... Cons: not a good flavor overall and ingredients too wet Read More