Miso-Glazed Tofu with Cabbage & Peppers

1 Review
From: EatingWell Magazine January/February 1999

Roasting fresh vegetables and tofu with a gingery Asian marinade makes a comforting one-dish winter meal. Be sure to schedule enough time for the tofu to marinate before roasting.

Ingredients 4 servings

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  • 3 tablespoons mirin, or dry sherry (see Note)
  • 3 tablespoons miso, preferably dark (see Note)
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chile-garlic sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 14 ounces extra-firm tofu, preferably water-packed
  • 1 small green cabbage, cored and cut into 8 wedges
  • 2 large red bell peppers, seeded and sliced
  • 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted (see Tip)

Preparation

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  • Ready In

  1. Whisk mirin (or sherry), miso, ginger, lemon juice, soy sauce, sugar, chile-garlic sauce and oil in a small bowl until blended. Drain and rinse tofu; pat dry. Cut the block into eight 1/2-inch-thick slabs. Arrange the tofu slices in a single layer in a shallow nonreactive pan; pour 1/3 cup of the marinade over it, turning to coat. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
  2. Preheat oven to 425 °F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch roasting pan with cooking spray. Arrange cabbage wedges, cut-side down, in 2 rows. Scatter bell peppers around the cabbage. Sprinkle with scallions. Pour the remaining marinade over the vegetables. Cover tightly with foil. Bake the vegetables until tender, 25 to 35 minutes.
  3. When the vegetables are tender, overlap the tofu slices in the center of the pan and baste with any pan juices. Roast, uncovered, until the tofu is heated through, 12 to 15 minutes more. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve.
  • Notes: Mirin is a sweet, low-alcohol rice wine essential in Japanese cooking. Look for it in your supermarket with the Asian or gourmet ingredients.
  • Sherry is a type of fortified wine originally from southern Spain. Don't use the “cooking sherry” sold in many supermarkets—it can be surprisingly high in sodium. Instead, purchase dry sherry that's sold with other fortified wines in your wine or liquor store.
  • Miso is fermented soybean paste made by inoculating a mixture of soybeans, salt and grains (usually barley or rice) with koji, a beneficial mold. Aged for up to 3 years, miso is undeniably salty, but a little goes a long way. Akamiso (red miso), made from barley or rice and soybeans, is salty and tangy, and the most commonly used miso in Japan. Use in marinades for meat and oily fish, and in long-simmered dishes. Shiromiso (sweet or white miso), made with soy and rice, is yellow and milder in flavor; use for soup, salad dressings and sauces for fish or chicken.
  • Tip: To toast sesame seeds: Place in a small dry skillet and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until fragrant and lightly browned, 2 to 4 minutes.

Nutrition information

  • Per serving: 308 calories; 8 g fat(1 g sat); 11 g fiber; 38 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 64 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 21 g sugars; g added sugars; 2878 IU vitamin A; 243 mg vitamin C; 195 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 700 mg sodium; 916 mg potassium
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
  • Exchanges: 1/2 other carbohydrate, 4 vegetable, 1 1/2 lean meat, 1/2 fat

Reviews 1

February 24, 2014
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By: EatingWell User
Easy and Delicious My whole family enjoyed this dinner tonight including kids. We must be big eaters because I thought the portions were small so I made a side of spinach and cheese tortellini served with fresh pesto. We almost finished that too. I will add this to our rotation as we're always looking for another delicious dinner option. Thank you. Pros: simple 1 dish meal. Cons: portions are small