In this 30-minute healthy dinner recipe, whole-grain freekeh cooks unattended while you finish the rest of the meal. Using baby vegetables cuts down on prep time because they can be cooked whole. Look for them near prepared and/or specialty vegetables. If you can't find them, use 4 cups sliced small zucchini or summer squash instead (1/2-inch-thick slices).

EatingWell Test Kitchen
Source: EatingWell Magazine, May/June 2016
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Ingredients

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Directions

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  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

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  • Combine water, freekeh, 1 tablespoon oil, saffron and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer, cover and cook until the water is absorbed, about 20 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, toss squash with 1 tablespoon oil and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Sprinkle pork with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Combine honey, garlic and harissa in a small bowl.

  • Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat; add the pork and cook until browned on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Turn the pork over and brush with the harissa mixture. Scatter the squash around the pork.

  • Roast until an instant-read thermometer registers 145 degrees in the center of the pork, about 10 minutes. Slice the pork, if desired. Serve with the squash and freekeh, drizzled with the pan juices.

Tips

Freekeh is wheat that's been harvested when it's still young, roasted and then cracked into a grain that looks similar to bulgur. Relatively new to the U.S., the chewy whole grain has a mild nutty flavor and is higher in fiber, protein and minerals than grains that are harvested once fully mature. Look for it in well-stocked supermarkets and natural-foods stores.

Saffron adds flavor and golden color to a variety of Middle Eastern, African and European foods. Find it in the spice section of supermarkets, gourmet shops or at tienda.com. It will keep in an airtight container for several years.

Harissa is a fiery Tunisian chile paste commonly used in North African cooking. Find it at specialty-foods stores or online. Different brands vary in heat, so start with a little and taste as you go.

Nutrition Facts

443.7 calories; protein 32.2g 65% DV; carbohydrates 46.2g 15% DV; exchange other carbs 3; dietary fiber 9.1g 37% DV; sugars 12g; fat 14.8g 23% DV; saturated fat 2.4g 12% DV; cholesterol 73.7mg 25% DV; vitamin a iu 218.2IU 4% DV; vitamin c 19.8mg 33% DV; folate 26.2mcg 7% DV; calcium 52.1mg 5% DV; iron 3.4mg 19% DV; magnesium 92.7mg 33% DV; potassium 752.9mg 21% DV; sodium 710.7mg 28% DV; thiamin 1.2mg 118% DV; added sugar 7g.

Reviews (1)

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2 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 2
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
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Rating: 5 stars
11/12/2017
Couldn t find harissa but tasty with a substitute chili paste Read More