Sprouted-Wheat Biscuits

Sprouted-Wheat Biscuits

2 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine, January/February 2015

In this healthy buttermilk biscuit recipe, sprouted whole-wheat flour lends the nutritional benefits of whole-wheat flour without the bitterness. If you can't find sprouted flour, white whole-wheat and all-purpose flour are good substitutes. Adapted with permission from Bread Revolution by Peter Reinhart (Ten Speed Press, © 2014).

Ingredients 24 servings

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Original recipe yields 24 servings
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  • 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons sprouted whole-wheat flour, plus ¼- ½ cup for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon plus ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 10 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1¼ cups buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon canola oil

Preparation

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  • Ready In

  1. Pulse flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a food processor until combined. Add butter and pulse until evenly combined and in pea-size bits. Add buttermilk and pulse in very short bursts until evenly incorporated. The dough will be soft and a little shaggy looking.
  2. Generously dust a work surface with flour. Use a rubber spatula to transfer the dough to the work surface. Sprinkle with more flour. With floured hands, gently pat the dough into a rectangle about ¾ inch thick, with a long edge facing you. Gently roll out the dough to ½ inch thick, using short strokes from the center outward and very little pressure, dusting the dough and surface with more flour as needed. Run an offset spatula under the dough, then gently fold it in thirds, like a letter.
  3. Dust the work surface with more flour and rotate the dough 90 degrees. Dust the dough and roll out again into a ½-inch-thick rectangle, then fold it in thirds again. Repeat the process two more times (for four folds total), dusting the work surface and the dough with flour each time before rolling out.
  4. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the folded dough on it and refrigerate for 15 minutes.
  5. Brush a clean work surface with oil, place the dough on it and gently roll out to ½ inch thick. Cut out biscuits with a floured 2-inch round cutter. Press the scraps back together and reroll, to make about 24 biscuits total. Place the biscuits ½ inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for 15 minutes. (Or cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.)
  6. Position a rack in the upper third of oven; preheat to 500°F.
  7. Place the pan of biscuits on the upper rack. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 450 degrees . Bake until rich golden brown, 12 to 14 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool for 5 minutes. Serve warm.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 5, cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.
  • Equipment: 2-inch round cutter, offset spatula

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: 1 biscuit
  • Per serving: 92 calories; 5 g fat(3 g sat); 1 g fiber; 10 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 6 mcg folate; 13 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 155 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin C; 60 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 158 mg sodium; 65 mg potassium
  • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
  • Exchanges: ½ starch, 1 fat

Reviews 2

April 13, 2015
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By: TucsonTeeter
Forgiving dough This dough is forgiving. Each of the 24 biscuits turned out tender even though some of the dough was reshaped numerous times. The sprouted wheat flour creates a sweet tasting biscuit even though there is just 1 tablespoon of sugar in the recipe. This dough is easy to mix up, but very sticky and is difficult to handle. The good news is that the directions are clear and easy to follow. Be aware that the biscuit is about 1/3 of a typical biscuit. That is why a single biscuit has just 90 calories. Most people are likely to eat 3 biscuits. I'll make this again for a special occasion. Pros: Every biscuit is tender, Sweet, Whole grain, Make-ahead Cons: Difficult dough to work with, Tiny
April 11, 2015
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By: TucsonTeeter
Very forgiving biscuit recipe The dough is forgiving. Even the final biscuit made from dough that had been rolled numerous times was still tender. This biscuit is delicious with a buttery flavor and a tender texture. There is no harsh whole wheat flavor, though the flour is technically a whole wheat. This is not a typical biscuit dough. It's very moist and the kneading technique was unique for me. The instructions are well-written, so I had no trouble following the procedure. Pros: Tasty, elicate, wholesome, Can be prepared in advance Cons: Challenging dough, unfamiliar technique
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