Pear & Apple Galette

3 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine November/December 2013

In this beautiful pear and apple galette recipe, the juicy fruit tops a layer of moist, spiced ginger crumble. We like to serve this rustic tart with a small scoop of vanilla ice cream or lightly sweetened whipped cream for dessert.

Ingredients 12 servings

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  • Pastry Dough
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup white whole-wheat flour (see Tip)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchâtel)
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons cold low-fat milk
  • Gingersnap Layer
  • 2/3 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Pinch of ground cloves
  • Pinch of salt
  • Pinch of freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • Fruit Layer
  • 1 pound firm ripe pears, such as Bartlett or Bosc
  • 1 pound tart apples, such as Granny Smith or Pippin
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • Garnish & Glaze
  • 1 tablespoon coarse or granulated sugar
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup apple or apricot jelly or fruit spread

Preparation

  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. To prepare pastry dough: Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. When it starts bubbling, cook, stirring and watching carefully so it doesn't burn, until golden brown, 2 to 6 minutes. Transfer to a metal bowl and refrigerate until solid again, 25 to 30 minutes.
  2. Combine whole-wheat flour, 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, lemon zest and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a food processor. Pulse once or twice to mix. Cut the butter and cream cheese into pieces; add and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add oil and pulse until it looks like wet sand. Add milk and pulse until small clumps form.
  3. Transfer the dough to a sheet of parchment paper and press into a ball, then press the ball into a disk about 8 inches wide. Wrap in the parchment and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 1 day before rolling out.
  4. To prepare gingersnap layer: Combine oats, 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup sugar, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, pinch of salt and pepper in a food processor; pulse until the mixture looks like fine gravel. Add molasses and pulse briefly. Set aside.
  5. To prepare fruit layer: Peel, quarter and core pears and apples. Cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Toss in a large bowl with lemon juice, 1/3 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon flour and pinch of salt.
  6. To roll out pastry: Dust a sheet of parchment paper, and the dough, with flour. Roll the dough out into a 15-inch circle. Go slowly and if it cracks just press the pieces together. Dust with flour as needed and keep the circle as even as you can, but don't worry about rough edges.
  7. Preheat oven to 375 °F.
  8. To assemble & bake: Spread the gingersnap mixture over the pastry, leaving a 2-inch border. Arrange overlapping slices of fruit in a concentric circle over the gingersnap layer. Drizzle any syrup left in the bowl over the fruit.
  9. Use the parchment to lift the edges of the pastry and fold loosely over the filling in 2- or 3-inch sections. It may crack as you fold it, but that's fine. Combine 1 tablespoon sugar with a pinch of nutmeg and sprinkle on top. Transfer the galette, parchment and all, onto a baking sheet. Trim off overhanging parchment.
  10. Bake the galette until the edges are lightly browned, 40 to 45 minutes.
  11. Heat jelly (or fruit spread) in a small saucepan, stirring, until it looks like a thin glaze. Brush the glaze over the warm fruit with a pastry brush.
  12. Let cool at least 15 minutes on the baking sheet. Lift parchment and galette onto a platter; slide the parchment out. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Refrigerate pastry dough for up to 1 day or freeze airtight for up to 3 months; thaw overnight in the refrigerator. Let stand at room temperature for 10 minutes before rolling.
  • Equipment: Parchment paper
  • Tip: White whole-wheat flour, made from a special variety of white wheat, is light in color and flavor but has the same nutritional properties as regular whole-wheat flour. It is available at large supermarkets and natural-foods stores and online at bobsredmill.com or kingarthurflour.com. Store it in the freezer.

Nutrition information

  • Per serving: 325 calories; 9 g fat(3 g sat); 4 g fiber; 58 g carbohydrates; 5 g protein; 53 mcg folate; 15 mg cholesterol; 31 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 192 IU vitamin A; 4 mg vitamin C; 43 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 173 mg sodium; 201 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Iron (15% daily value)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 4
  • Exchanges: 1 1/2 starch, 1 fruit, 1 1/2 other carbohydrate, 1 1/2 fat

Reviews 3

March 16, 2014
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By: EatingWell User
Wonderful blend of flavors I made this for a potluck and it was a big hit. Everyone enjoyed the gingerbread surprise inside which blended well with the sweet pears and tart apples. Be prepared to take a large block of time when making this dish though. I did not read completely through the recipe when I started to make this. The crust takes a lot of extra time so prepare for it. Pros: Interesting combination of flavors Cons: Time consuming
November 30, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Fancy name for tart One of my guests is dairy free so I used a premade pie-crust and rolled it out to the 15inches. Also, I mixed my apples (granny smith, Fiji, macintosh) and one pear. I used plum jam for the glaze but want to try honey next time. This is a fabulous recipe one I will make again and again. We all enjoyed it! Pros: Lighter than apple pie and not overly sweet.
November 07, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Well worth the effot. This sounds like an intensive project, which it is, but I've made much more difficult desserts. What I loved was the emphasis on fall fruits and the reliance on their sweetness for the flavor. The crust was incredible. I'm guessing it was the Neufch+ótel that made it so amazing. I'd actually recommend this crust for every other pie project! Notes: if your apples and pears are sweet (tart apples aren't necessary, I used very sweet ones and they worked well) don't bother adding sugar to them. The gingersnap crust perfectly complemented the pears, but was strange with the apples; the molasses was overpowering. Cut back on molasses if you have sweet apples. Also, I didn't make the glaze because I felt there was enough sugar already, but without it the fruit isn't as pretty - it looks dry. Pros: Not too sweet, delectable crust, seasonable fruits, very beautiful Cons: gingersnap crust was strange