A touch of brown sugar added to the salty black bean-garlic sauce is what gives this noodle stir-fry its unmistakable Chinese takeout flavor. The recipe for vegetarian chow fun works equally well with slices of sirloin steak or boneless, skinless chicken breast or even pork tenderloin.

EatingWell Test Kitchen
Source: EatingWell Magazine, March/April 2011
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Fill a large nonstick skillet with water and bring to a boil. Add noodles and cook, stirring frequently, until just tender, 4 to 6 minutes or according to package directions. Drain, rinse with cold water and transfer to a large bowl. Wipe the pan dry.

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  • Meanwhile, combine Shao Hsing (or sherry), black bean-garlic sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar and cornstarch in a small bowl; set aside.

  • Heat 2 teaspoons oil in the pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium. Add ginger and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add onion and cook, stirring, until softened, 1 to 3 minutes. Add vegetables and 1/4 cup water; cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender-crisp, 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer the vegetables to the bowl with the noodles. Wipe the pan dry.

  • Pat tofu dry and cut into 3/4-inch cubes. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in the pan over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and cook, stirring every 2 to 3 minutes, until golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes total. Stir the reserved sauce and add to the pan; cook, stirring, until the sauce has thickened slightly, 1 to 2 minutes.

  • Return the noodles and vegetables to the pan along with the remaining 1/4 cup water; cook, tossing to coat with the sauce, until heated through, about 2 minutes more.

Tips

Notes: Look for dried wide rice noodles, sometimes called “Pad Thai noodles” or “straight-cut,” in the Asian-food section at most supermarkets and natural-foods stores. Annie Chun's brand now makes brown rice noodles that are becoming more widely available. We like to use them in place of regular rice noodles because they have 4 grams of fiber per serving versus 0 grams in noodles made with white rice.

Shao Hsing, or Shaoxing, is a seasoned rice wine. It is available in most Asian specialty markets and in the Asian section of some larger supermarkets.

Sherry, a type of fortified wine originally from southern Spain, is an acceptable substitute. Don't use the “cooking sherry” sold in many supermarkets--it can be surprisingly high in sodium. Instead, get dry sherry that's sold with other fortified wines at your wine or liquor store.

Black bean-garlic sauce, a savory, salty sauce used in Chinese cooking, is made from fermented black soybeans, garlic and rice wine. Find it in the Asian-foods section of most supermarkets or at Asian markets. Refrigerate for up to 1 year.

People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.

Nutrition Facts

393.2 calories; protein 13.3g 27% DV; carbohydrates 56.6g 18% DV; exchange other carbs 4; dietary fiber 3.5g 14% DV; sugars 4.6g; fat 10.6g 16% DV; saturated fat 1.4g 7% DV; cholesterolmg; vitamin a iu 1501.2IU 30% DV; vitamin c 22.5mg 38% DV; folate 24.3mcg 6% DV; calcium 279mg 28% DV; iron 2.3mg 13% DV; magnesium 50.2mg 18% DV; potassium 227.1mg 6% DV; sodium 711.3mg 29% DV; thiamin 0.1mg 9% DV; added sugar 1g.