Dried mushrooms give this rich red-wine sauce an almost meaty flavor. Look for them in the produce department of well-stocked supermarkets or specialty grocers. If you're not a fan of salmon, try the recipe with halibut instead. Serve with barley tossed with parsley and steamed broccolini. To double: Prepare a double batch of sauce in the large skillet, increasing reduction time as needed. Cook 2 1/2 pounds of salmon in two batches, adding oil as necessary. Source: EatingWell Magazine, November/December 2010

EatingWell Test Kitchen
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Combine mushrooms and boiling water in a small bowl. Soak until the mushrooms are softened, 12 to 15 minutes. Strain the soaking liquid through a paper towel-lined sieve into a bowl. Rinse the mushrooms; finely chop. Stir together 1 tablespoon of the soaking liquid and cornstarch in a small bowl.

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  • Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add shallots and cook, stirring, until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and cook for 1 minute more. Stir in wine and cook, stirring, until reduced to about 1/2 cup, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the remaining soaking liquid and seafood stock (or clam juice) to the pan. Bring to a simmer and cook until the sauce is reduced to 1 1/2 cups, 10 to 14 minutes.

  • Stir the cornstarch mixture and stir it into the simmering sauce. Cook, stirring, until slightly thickened, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in butter, lemon juice and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper.

  • Meanwhile, season salmon with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the salmon and cook until just cooked through, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Serve with the mushroom sauce.

Tips

Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 3, cover and refrigerate the sauce for up to 1 day. Reheat the sauce just before serving.

Note: Bottled clam juice can be high in sodium. We like Bar Harbor brand, which has 120 mg sodium per 2-ounce serving. Look for it near canned fish or in the seafood department.

Tip: For more information about wild-caught salmon, visit seafoodwatch.org. To skin a salmon fillet, place it skin-side down and, starting at the tail end, slip a long, sharp knife between flesh and skin, holding the skin down with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, without cutting through fillet or skin.

Nutrition Facts

303 calories; 12.6 g total fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 69 mg cholesterol; 458 mg sodium. 713 mg potassium; 6.6 g carbohydrates; 0.6 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 30.9 g protein; 399 IU vitamin a iu; 3 mg vitamin c; 22 mcg folate; 70 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 53 mg magnesium;

Reviews (1)

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1 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 1
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Rating: 5 stars
10/29/2011
Yum! This is SO good! I served it with steamed Asparagus. I couldn't find morels so I used dried porcinis instead. It looked very fancy and my husband loved it. It's a long time to be working buy you're busy the entire time and it's worth it. The only problem I had was skinning the salmon. It was difficult and tedious. But the fish I got had a great flavor and everything just went together beautifully. Loved it. Pros: a bit too much sauce left over Cons: skinning the fish Read More