Recipe Image

Roasted Corn & Shiitake Mushrooms

  • 30 m
  • 40 m
EatingWell Test Kitchen
“Roasting brings out the sweetness of the corn and browns the shiitake mushrooms. Rice wine and soy sauce balance the flavors. Try it with grilled pork tenderloin.”

Ingredients

    • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
    • 3 scallions, minced
    • 4 cups sliced shiitake mushroom caps
    • 3 tablespoons Shao Hsing (or Shaoxing) or dry sherry (see Note)
    • 3 cups fresh corn kernels (about 3 large ears; see Tip) or frozen
    • 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided

Directions

  • 1 Preheat oven to 450°F.
  • 2 Toss mushrooms with 1 tablespoon oil in a medium bowl. Spread in an even layer on a baking sheet. Roast for 10 minutes.
  • 3 Stir corn and the remaining 1 tablespoon oil into the mushrooms; spread the mixture in an even layer. Return the baking sheet to the oven and roast for 10 minutes more.
  • 4 Meanwhile, combine Shao Hsing (or sherry), soy sauce and scallions in a small bowl. Add the mixture to the vegetables and stir to combine. Return to the oven and continue roasting until the liquid has evaporated and the vegetables are beginning to brown, about 10 minutes more.
  • Tip: To cut kernels from the cob, stand an ear of corn on one end and slice the kernels off with a sharp knife.
  • Note: Shao Hsing, or Shaoxing, is a seasoned rice wine. It is available in most Asian specialty markets and in the Asian section of some larger supermarkets. Sherry is a type of fortified wine originally from southern Spain. Don't use the “cooking sherry” sold in many supermarkets—it can be surprisingly high in sodium. Instead, get dry sherry that's sold with other fortified wines at your wine or liquor store.
  • Cut Down on Dishes: A rimmed baking sheet is great for everything from roasting to catching accidental drips and spills. For effortless cleanup and to keep your baking sheets in tip-top shape, line them with a layer of foil before each use.
  • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.
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