Not only is this seeded loaf high in fiber, but the blend of seeds and grains lends it a wonderfully nutty flavor, aroma and texture. A heavy container with a tight-fitting lid works best, as the steam trapped inside the pot helps crisp the crust of the boule. Keep in mind that in a very wide-bottomed pot the loaf will spread out and be fairly flat; in a taller, narrower one it will be thicker and have more height (but may take slightly longer to bake). Source: EatingWell Magazine, January/February 2009

Nancy Baggett
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Ingredients

Directions

  • Mix dough: Grind rice in a blender or coffee mill (a food processor won't work) until mostly powdery but with some fine bits remaining. Transfer to a 6-quart (or larger) bowl. Thoroughly stir in 2 1/2 cups whole-wheat flour, 2 cups bread flour, oats, wheat germ, 2 tablespoons each pepitas (or sunflower seeds), flaxseeds, poppy seeds and sesame seeds, the salt and yeast. Thoroughly whisk 2 1/2 cups ice water and honey in a medium bowl. Vigorously stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, scraping down the sides and mixing just until the dough is thoroughly blended. The dough should be moist and somewhat sticky, but fairly stiff. (The seeds will absorb moisture, stiffening the dough as it stands.) If the mixture is too dry, stir in just enough additional ice water to facilitate mixing, but don't overmoisten. If the dough is too wet, stir in just enough bread flour to stiffen slightly. Lightly coat the top with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

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  • First rise: Let the dough rise at room temperature (about 70 degrees F) for 12 to 18 hours; if convenient, stir once partway through the rise. For convenience (and improved flavor), you may refrigerate the dough for 3 to 12 hours before starting the first rise.

  • Second rise: Generously coat a 4- to 6-quart Dutch oven (or similar ovenproof pot) with oil. Coat the bottom and sides with 2 tablespoons whole-wheat flour. Vigorously stir the dough to deflate it. If it is soft, stir in just enough flour to yield a firm but moist dough (it should be fairly hard to stir). Transfer the dough to the pot.

  • Sprinkle the remaining 1 tablespoon whole-wheat flour over the dough; pat and smooth it in. Firmly tuck the sides underneath all the way around to form a round ball of dough; dust with more flour as needed. Brush the loaf with egg substitute (or egg white) and sprinkle the remaining 2 tablespoons pepitas (or sunflower seeds) and 1 tablespoon each flaxseeds, poppy seeds and sesame seeds over the top (it will be heavily coated). Using well-oiled kitchen shears or a serrated knife, cut two 1/2-inch-deep concentric circles in the top of the loaf, one about 2 1/2 inches out from the center, the other 3 1/2 inches out. Put the lid on the pot or tightly cover with foil.

  • Let rise at warm room temperature until the dough is double the deflated size, 1 1/4 to 2 1/4 hours. (For an accelerated rise, see Tip.)

  • 20 minutes before baking: Position a rack in lower third of oven; preheat to 475 degrees F.

  • Bake, cool, slice: Reduce oven temperature to 450 degrees . Lightly spritz or sprinkle the loaf with water. Bake, covered, on the lower rack until the top is lightly browned, 50 to 60 minutes. Uncover and bake until a skewer inserted in the center comes out with just a few crumbs on the tip (or until an instant-read thermometer registers 204-206 degrees ), 15 to 25 minutes longer. Cool in the pot on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes. Turn the loaf out on the rack and let cool to at least warm before slicing.

Tips

To make ahead: Wrap airtight and keep at room temperature for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 2 months.

Note: Milled from high-protein wheats, bread flour develops strong gluten, resulting in well-risen loaves. It helps give breads with a high percentage of whole grains better structure and a lighter texture. Find it near other flours in most supermarkets.

Tips: To prepare “ice water” for this recipe, add a heaping cup of ice cubes to cold water and stir for about 30 seconds before measuring out the water.

You can turn your microwave into a warm, moist environment to help accelerate the second rise of the bread dough. Begin by microwaving 1/2 cup water in a 1-cup glass measure just to boiling. Set the water in one corner of the microwave, place the pan of dough on the other side of the turned-off microwave and close the door. The dough will double in size in 45 minutes to 11/2 hours.

Nutrition Facts

198 calories; 2.9 g total fat; 0.4 g saturated fat; 334 mg sodium. 147 mg potassium; 37.5 g carbohydrates; 3.9 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 6.9 g protein; 11 IU vitamin a iu; 1 mg vitamin c; 65 mcg folate; 44 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 53 mg magnesium;

Reviews (21)

Read More Reviews
21 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 20
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
10/20/2015
Outstanding taste time-management nightmare My friends and I love this bread a lot. I'm trying to figure out how to make it successfully in my Romertopf clay cooker and using my sourdough starter instead of the yeast. I don't know how to be certain of either. I have found instructions for using the clay cooker....and I plan to try the cold start method. But I would love help on the sourdough starter piece (I have a very lively starter). Pros: Taste and texture are unparalleled. Cons: The 18-24 hr first rise is difficult to judge. Read More
Rating: 4 stars
10/07/2013
This is one of the easiest and most delicious batter breads I have ever tried. My quest for more fiber and nutrition in my homemade breads has been accomplished in this recipe. Only change I made was a little more honey. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
01/29/2013
It was so good it did not last 2 days!! I am working on loaf #2. Well worth the little extra time!! Read More
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Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I have made this bread dozens of times now. It is a staple for our family. Got tired of grinding rice I now use raw quinoa same amount with excellent results. I have also substituted corn meal for the wheat germ yummy. Also I agree with other comments mixing honey into ice water is a ridiculous exercise. I just drizzle the honey onto the mixed dry ingredients before adding the water. I have made many loaves where the only change I made was using ice water or cold water straight from the tap. I could not discern any difference. Did same experiment using regular yeast and quick rise yeast. Again no difference. Don't be afraid to experiment is the moral of this story. Christine Lopez Island WA Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
Just a note; Grind whole flax meal with the rice or seperatly as whole flsx seed does not digest in the system. Ground flax meal can be purchased in most markets and all health food stores. Flax seed meal and oil must be kept in the refridgerator as it will go rancid rather quickly if left out...Chef Jim Jim Harrison Parkersburg WV Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I've now made this VERY EASY bread twice. Both times it turned out excellent. In fact my husband and I both believe this is one of the best breads we've ever had. It's absolutely delicious. I made it for Easter dinner with friends and everyone who came loved it too. After trying my hand at homemade bread many times over the years with mediocre results I now feel like an expert bread maker. Seattle foodie Shoreline WA Read More
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Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I made this bread as soon as my magazine came in the mail. Even though I used three smaller baking vessels it came out WONDERFUL! Since then I have purchased the Kneadlessly Simple book and have tried two other breads the oat bread and the rye bread and they turned out WONDERFUL too! I will be baking my own bread from now on because it truly is simple and you can do so much while it is rising. Thank you Eating Well for bringing this great way of making bread to my attention. I will pass it on to others with a sample of my bread! Caz Sugarloaf PA Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
This bread was a bit dense dark and savory with lots of flavor. It was more complicated to make than most breads because there are many ingredients but the result is worth the work. It is a big loaf 3 pounds so be sure you have enough people to eat it while it is fresh. Cooking it in the dutch oven is a great technique that can be applied to other breads too so it's a good one to do to learn how this works. Catherine Cincinnati OH Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
Made this bread yesterday. It is excellent! We love it! I made a couple of changes...since we are watching salt intake I only added 1 t. salt. I also added 1 T. molasses. Put half in the freezer and half to eat now. I will definitely be making this one again. Thank you Susan Susan WI Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I have made this bread a number of times and it has become our staple bread. It is simply wonderful and the recipe extremely forgiving. You can store the dough in the refrigerator for at least 2 weeks (I have not tried longer but suspect that it could hold for at least a month) either before or after the first rise. It acquires an amazing depth of flavor with storage; the best flavor was after 2 weeks of storage. After storing in the refrigerator I usually deflate it on the counter to an approximately rectangular shape when I take it out to room temperature fold it twice (like a letter but in both orientations) let it rise at least until I see the first hint of rising but up to a couple hours if I am busy with other things (it is very forgiving) deflate again shape put in the Dutch oven (or a "Cloche" which works even better) let it rise slash bake. About mixing the honey and iced water: don't. Mix the honey with 1/2 cup warm water to decrease viscosity then add the remaining 2 cups tap water THEN add the ice. Oh and I forgot to add the honey when I made it yesterday and it still tasted wonderful; in fact I will probably stop adding honey in the future. I grind the rice as described but I assume store bough brown rice flour would work too and one can be very liberal with the seeds. I am sure it would still be very good without any or most of them although they do add a nice flavor texture and look. Yves Bloomington IN Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
This recipe does call for a whole lot of wholesome ingredients but rest assured it is well worth the extra effort!! I have been making it for several weeks now pretty regularly. So just like trying anything new for the first time it does seem a little cumbersome. But now it is just kind of second nature. I follow the recipe exactly except I do the recipe plus 1/2 more for my dutch oven. The bread turns out perfect every time. We love this loaf. I love the fact that I don't have to knead and knead. I basically just throw everything in the bowl and cover it up and let it rise!! The bread does not have a yeasty taste at all. It is a wonderful recipe! Hope Clark Roanoke VA Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
Bread baking is always so hit or miss with me. This technique was not at all labor intensive and the results were delicious. Even my finicky teens went back for seconds. That it is fairly healthy is a super bonus! Dlogan Philly suburbs PA Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I loved this recipe. Way too salty for "eating well" so I ended up adding another half cup of whole wheat and cup of bread flour used 3 & 1/8 cup warm water 3 &1/2 tsp yeast and added 1 tablespoon molasses for extra flavor. I'm way to impatient for a slow rise and just used my KitchenAid. I used a large Emile Henre casserole and it was perfect. I've made this 3 times now and recommend just 2 tsp salt. General rule of thumb is 1 tsp salt and 2 &1/4 tsp yeast and 3 & 1/2 c flour to each loaf of bread in most bread recipes but this is basically a double recipe. Question anything other ratio as lots of recipes have mistakes. Ann Falcon Heights MN Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I followed this recipe to a T and it turned out great both times! It does take a LONG time to mix honey and ice water but it does work. I used a wisk. My one problem is that the oil used to coat the dutch oven makes a funny crust on the bottom of the bread. But if you don't use it the bread sticks strongly to the pot. Katie K. Durham NC Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I thought this recipe wasn't too hard for my first loaf of bread to make. It was pretty tasty. Only problem I had was i didn't have unbleached flower used bleached and my sunflower seeds tasted bad(old). I couldn't find the pepitas in the grocery store. I separated the dough into 2 portions and cooked in separate 2 qt casseroles dishes since I don't have a dutch oven. This turned out ok and tasted pretty good. Stephanie Poughkeepsie NY Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
Really enjoyed making this recipe! It was fun to see it "mix" and rise over the day and turned out very well. Great hearty bread...made great French toast too!!! Laura Coeur d Alene ID Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
For a no-knead bread this was pretty fussy not to mention it did need a ton of ingredients. I would really like to know how the author actually managed to throughly mix ice-water and honey. It is impossible and I even had warm honey. Not sure I'd make this again. Anonymous Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
This recipe has been corrected since it ran in the January/February 2009 edition of the magazine. The end of Step 2 should read: "For convenience (and improved flavor) you may refrigerate the dough for 3 to 12 hours before starting the FIRST rise." Editor's Note Charlotte VT Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
I have made this bread three times and each time it has turned out wonderfully! I used both the pepitas and the sunflower seeds as well as all other ingredients listed. It turned out looking like an artisan loaf bought at an expensive European bakery. An enameled cast iron dutch oven produced a wonderful textured loaf. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
almost 200c per slice? give me a break. That is not 'healthy'. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2011
An amazingly good bread. Love the texture and seeds. I make it often and have substituted sour dough starte for the yeast. Yummy! Read More