The arrival of the first sweet onions of the season is an event to be celebrated, and this dish does just that. The onions are slow-cooked in the oven--which brings out even more sweetness--and then combined with both orange zest and juice, plus some balsamic vinegar to balance the flavors. Jumbo shrimp are added here, but sweet scallops would be delicious as well. Source: EatingWell Magazine, May/June 2008

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Ingredients

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Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

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  • Toss onions, oil and salt in a 9-by-13-inch baking pan until coated. Cover with foil. Bake until softened and juicy, about 45 minutes.

  • Remove foil, stir and continue baking, uncovered, until the onions around the edges of the pan are lightly golden, 25 to 30 minutes.

  • Stir in orange zest, orange juice, vinegar, rosemary and crushed red pepper. Bake until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 30 minutes.

  • Stir in shrimp and bake until cooked through, 20 to 25 minutes. Stir in scallion greens and serve.

Tips

Note: Shrimp is usually sold by the number needed to make one pound. For example, “21-25 count” means there will be 21 to 25 shrimp in a pound. Size names, such as “large” or “extra large,” are not standardized, so to be sure you're getting the size you want, order by the count (or number) per pound.

Both wild-caught and farm-raised shrimp can damage the surrounding ecosystems when not managed properly. Fortunately, it is possible to buy shrimp that have been raised or caught with sound environmental practices. Look for fresh or frozen shrimp certified by an independent agency, such as Wild American Shrimp or Marine Stewardship Council. If you can't find certified shrimp, choose wild-caught shrimp from North America--it's more likely to be sustainably caught.

To peel shrimp, grasp the legs and hold onto the tail while you twist off the shell. Save the shells to make a tasty stock: Simmer, in enough water to cover, for 10 minutes, then strain. The “vein” running along a shrimp's back (technically the dorsal surface, opposite the legs) under a thin layer of flesh is really its digestive tract.

To devein, use a paring knife to make a slit along the length of the shrimp. Under running water, remove the tract with the knife tip.

Nutrition Facts

257 calories; 8.9 g total fat; 1.4 g saturated fat; 214 mg cholesterol; 1259 mg sodium. 493 mg potassium; 19 g carbohydrates; 1.9 g fiber; 12 g sugar; 24.6 g protein; 406 IU vitamin a iu; 21 mg vitamin c; 77 mcg folate; 134 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 55 mg magnesium;

Reviews (2)

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2 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 0
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 4 stars
05/25/2013
Delicious but be careful with the onions The first time I made this as a half recipe I put the onion pan too high in the oven and they cooked very rapidly when uncovered. I now use the bottom rack with the smaller amount of onions in a half recipe. My husband loves this dish. Pros: Delicious and memorable Cons: Careful with the onions in a 400 degree oven Read More
Rating: 3 stars
06/30/2012
Re: Just for fun Read More