Cooked Wheat Berries

Cooked Wheat Berries

7 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine March/April 2007

Contrary to popular belief, wheat berries do not require an overnight soak before cooking. Simply boil them for 1 hour to soften the kernels, which will produce their characteristically chewy texture.

Ingredients 1 serving

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  • 2 cups hard red winter-wheat berries, (see Tip)
  • 7 cups cold water
  • 1 teaspoon salt


  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. Sort through wheat berries carefully, discarding any stones. Rinse well under cool running water. Place in a large heavy saucepan. Add water and salt.
  2. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat, cover, and simmer gently for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Drain and rinse. To serve hot, use immediately. Otherwise, follow the make-ahead instructions.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days or freeze for up to 1 month.
  • Tip: Wheat berries can be found in natural-foods markets and online at King Arthur Flour, (800) 827-6836,, and Bob's Red Mill, (800) 349-2173,

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: 1/2 cup
  • Per serving: 151 calories; 1 g fat(0 g sat); 4 g fiber; 29 g carbohydrates; 6 g protein; 0 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 0 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin C; 23 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 265 mg sodium; 2 mg potassium
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
  • Exchanges: 2 starch

Reviews 7

March 19, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Cooking method can be shorter I eat wheat berries (often combined with oat groats) for breakfast, seasoned with just a few dried cranberries and a teaspoon of sunflower seeds. I put 3 or 4 cups in a 4.5 qt. Le Creuset pot with plenty of water, bring them to a boil, and then simmer for 30 to 40 minutes. They come out chewy but not too firm. I drain in a colander and rinse with cool water, keep about 1/3 in the fridge for the next week and freeze the rest for later.
June 13, 2012
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By: EatingWell User
Another way to spice wheatberries up If you are looking for a creative twist on wheat berries, try this recipe-- I worked at an organic, local coffee shop and bakery and we served this salad in bulk. It's great for something new and also great to bring to a potluck. Sliceup some spring onions and carrots and adding them to your cooked berries. Then add equal parts miso paste (yellow or red), olive oil, and water plus some honey (1 Tbsp for each cup of the other ingredients). Finally toss in rice wine vinegar/ mirin (half the amount of honey you used) and you'll have an amazing wheat berry salad! Pros: Good directions
December 01, 2011
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By: EatingWell User
I cook ahead & reheat for a quick breakfast cereal, adding a little brown sugar.
February 15, 2011
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By: erinmurphy17
Easy to make, yummy and good for you - sold. I made these for the first time last night - so easy and yummy. I put them in the fridge and plan to use them in veggie chili and soup I'll make tonight! Definitely worth making ahead and saving in the fridge/freezer. I'll probably start using wheatberries instead of rice in a lot of recipes. A new big fan!
September 07, 2010
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By: EatingWell User
I cook this in a black and decker steamer (2.5 cups wheat berries and fill the bowl with water to the top). I don't add salt or broth re: sodium. I turn on the steamer for 75 minutes and it cooks like rice, comes out perfectly, not mushy. I freeze in 1 - 2 cup vaccum packs for up to a year. I use in everything I cook, soups, stew, stirfries, breakfast cereal with oatmeal, and sprinkled on salads. Great way to get a whole grain with fiber and nutrition on a daily basis.
May 31, 2010
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By: EatingWell User
For an even simpler method, throw the wheat berries and water or broth in a slow cooker for 4 hours on "high" or 8 hours on "low".
October 27, 2009
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By: EatingWell User
I rinse the grain several times or until the water runs clear. I cook the grain in beef or chicken broth for a fuller flavor and use it just as you would rice. It's great with meats and vegetables. For something unusual (for Westerners) try "freekeh" instead of couscous or basamati.