Coffee-Balsamic Marinade

3 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine July/August 1998

You might not think of coffee as a marinade ingredient but it adds depth and flavor that's not duplicatable. Richly flavored meats like beef and lamb work best with this marinade.

Ingredients 1 serving

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  • 1/2 teaspoon instant-coffee granules
  • 1/2 cup hot water
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons crushed black pepper
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt

Preparation

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  • Ready In

  1. Dissolve coffee in hot water in a small bowl. Stir in vinegar, brown sugar, oil, garlic, pepper and salt. Use 1/2 cup to marinate beef or lamb. Reserve remaining marinade for basting.

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: 1 teaspoon
  • Per serving: 6 calories; 0 g fat(0 g sat); 0 g fiber; 1 g carbohydrates; 0 g protein; 0 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 1 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin C; 1 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 37 mg sodium; 8 mg potassium
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 0
  • Exchanges: none

Reviews 3

October 13, 2013
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By: SSteve
A long-time favorite This has been one of my go-to favorites since it was first published in 1998. I often use a teaspoon of dried minced garlic instead of fresh garlic just to save a little time. I don't think it makes much of a difference in the final product. Pros: NULL Cons: NULL
August 16, 2011
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By: gabeb77
My new favorite marinade! This is a great recipe and has quickly become my new favorite way to prepare a beef steak. It cooks up nice on a broiler pan in the oven at about 375 degrees. I'm eager to try other variations of this recipe. For example, adding a drop or two of liquid smoke flavoring or making this with other vinegars, such as seasoned rice vinegar or additional ingredients, such as onion, ginger or prepared mustard. I would also like to make a big batch of this recipe and use it on a rack of ribs. Also, though I have yet to try it, I believe this stuff would probably make a very tasty salad dressing, too. A bit of experimentation has already revealed a few things to me, however: 1.) ALWAYS add the olive oil last, after all the other ingredients have been mixed. Otherwise, the pepper will just float on the surface instead of mixing with the rest of the ingredients. 2.) You can substitute the 3 cloves of minced garlic with three 1/8 teaspoon measures of garlic powder. I didn't notice a difference in the flavor and the powder combined with the other ingredients a lot easier than the minced garlic. 3.) If you don't have any brown sugar, 4 or so teaspoons of ordinary granulated sugar work pretty well. The flavor won't be as sweet, tending to be more savory, but it still tastes delicious and will still give the meat an excellent flavor. 4.) I've found that the most effective way to marinate the meat, is to seal it inside a ziploc bag with enough marinade
May 05, 2010
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By: dvt76
This recipe made a great marinade for steak, although I thought it was a bit sweet. Next time I will decrease the brown sugar to 2 T (I used a Splenda/brown sugar blend) and increase the balsamic vinegar to 4 T. I also used 1 tsp red pepper flakes and 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper instead of 2 tsp of black pepper. Pros: Cons: