Tea Trade Chicken

1 Review
From: EatingWell Magazine November 1997

Having a well-stocked spice pantry pays off in this sophisticated dish; just stop at the store for the chicken and bell pepper. Serve braised bok choy and brown basmati rice alongside.

Ingredients 2 servings

for serving adjustment
Serving size has been adjusted!
Original recipe yields 2 servings
US
Metric
Nutrition per serving may change if servings are adjusted.
  • 1/4 cup rice wine, or dry sherry (see Note)
  • 2 tablespoons strong-brewed black tea
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened orange juice, or pineapple juice
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, trimmed of fat (8 ounces)
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil, divided
  • 1/2 small red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Preparation

  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. Combine rice wine (or sherry), tea, juice, soy sauce and honey in a small bowl.
  2. Combine cinnamon, ginger, pepper and salt in a small bowl. Rub spices evenly on both sides of chicken.
  3. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and reduce heat to medium. Cook until the chicken is golden outside and no longer pink in the middle, 5 to 7 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate and cover with foil to keep warm.
  4. Add the remaining 1 teaspoon oil to the pan. Add bell pepper and garlic; cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Increase heat to high and add the reserved rice wine-tea mixture. Bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Cook until the liquid is reduced by half, 1 to 2 minutes. Reduce heat to low and return the chicken and any accumulated juices to the pan. Simmer gently, spooning sauce over chicken, until heated through, about 1 minute.
  • Ingredient Notes: Sake is a dry rice wine generally available where wines are sold. Junmai, a special designation for sake, denotes sake brewed from rice that has been milled less than other special-designation sakes. More pure than other sakes, junmai has no distilled alcohol added. It is characterized by a well-rounded, rich flavor and body and more acidity than most sakes.
  • Sherry is a type of fortified wine originally from southern Spain. Don't use the “cooking sherry” sold in many supermarkets—it can be surprisingly high in sodium. Instead, purchase dry sherry that's sold with other fortified wines in your wine or liquor store.
  • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.

Nutrition information

  • Per serving: 239 calories; 7 g fat(1 g sat); 1 g fiber; 10 g carbohydrates; 24 g protein; 17 mcg folate; 63 mg cholesterol; 6 g sugars; 4 g added sugars; 628 IU vitamin A; 32 mg vitamin C; 25 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 469 mg sodium; 300 mg potassium
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 1/2

Reviews 1

September 29, 2009
profile image
By: EatingWell User
Sounds good, however, I need to know if there is a good substitute for the rice wine or sake. I can't cook with alcohol.