Proper Scottish Oat Scones

Proper Scottish Oat Scones

10 Reviews
From: EatingWell Magazine, May/June 1991

What alchemy gives scones their crumbly, buttery texture? And what wizardry it took to maintain that texture, after a little more than half the fat was cut from the original recipe. These are nutritionally superior to their forebears and offer 81 fewer calories.

Ingredients 8 servings

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Original recipe yields 8 servings
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  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 1/4 cups rolled oats
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose white flour
  • 3/4 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil

Preparation

  • Active

  • Ready In

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Spray a baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray or line it with parchment paper. Melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat and cook until it begins to turn light brown, about 2 minutes. Skim foam and pour into a small bowl.
  2. Stir together oats, flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Stir in raisins and make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. Combine the browned butter, egg, yogurt and oil in a small bowl; add to the dry ingredients, stirring just until moistened.
  3. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and gently knead several times to form a ball. Pat the ball into an 8-inch circle and cut into 8 wedges.
  4. Place the wedges on the prepared baking sheet and bake until lightly browned and firm to the touch, about 12 minutes. Transfer to a rack and let cool slightly. Serve warm.

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: 1 scone
  • Per serving: 258 calories; 8 g fat(3 g sat); 3 g fiber; 40 g carbohydrates; 6 g protein; 39 mcg folate; 31 mg cholesterol; 13 g sugars; 124 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin C; 138 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 396 mg sodium; 129 mg potassium
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2 1/2
  • Exchanges: 2 1/2 other carbohydrate, 2 fat

Reviews 10

August 30, 2014
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By: EatingWell User
Guilt free daily breakfast treat I make these scones weekly! Sometimes I add some cranberries and walnuts to the white raisins, plus some orange zest. I've made with lemon zest and dried cherries; dried apricots and flaked (unsweetened) coconut; lots of fresh cinnamon, chopped apples and pecans; and tomorrow will be fresh grated ginger, chopped crystallized ginger and almonds. The possibilities are endless and they always taste great! Pros: easy, adaptable
March 22, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Bland While the texture is very good, I found them a little bland. I would recommend adding a tsp of cinnamon to the batter Pros: Soft moist texture Cons: Needs more flavor
March 17, 2013
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By: emailclaires
great scones I've been making these for years! The browned butter is the trick to add flavor without tons of fat, and they are just lightly sweetened-perfect with morning latte on a relaxing weekend morning, especially for celebrating St Patrick's Day (like today!). I usually use all whole wheat pastry flour, and dried cranberries or dried blueberries instead of raisins. Love the orange zest idea; I bet that would combine perfectly with cranberries! Best eaten the same day as they dry out after a couple days. Pros: tasty. lower fat, whole grain
February 19, 2013
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By: EatingWell User
Very tasty, added orange zest This is a great alternative to higher calorie scones. I added orange zest and replaced about 1/8 cup of the yogurt with orange juice to change it up the second time I made them and it tasted great. Pros: Not much fat Cons: Taste so good I want to eat too many
June 05, 2012
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By: Jen C
I thought these were a bit dry and lacking flavor but I've not had that many scones in my lifetime so... Pros: Lower Calorie Cons: Dry
May 12, 2012
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By: EatingWell User
Lowfat scones that don't taste low fat I've used this delicious scone recipe that looks like any other scone -- and tastes better.-- since I first saw it in the magazine years ago. And I even use all whole wheat for the flour. My guests don't complain. Pros: A favorite family and guest recipe for years. Cons: Are there any?
April 29, 2012
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By: annamagpie
delicious a littlw dry--add a titch more liquid if at higher elevation to get the dough to stick together. delicious--not too sweet, Pros: healthful
April 29, 2012
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By: annamagpie
Great taste --add a titch more liquid if you are at higher altitude--just enough to hold the dough together. love the not-too-sweetness. husband says it has a really nice chewiness. Pros: pretty healthful, I would say Cons: A little dry
April 03, 2011
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By: chefliz
Great taste, but healthier These taste just like the "traditional" scones I've had in the past. Mixed some raisins in with them and served them with jam. Just the perfect breakfast for a sunday morning.