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Do You Grow Any of the Food You Eat? (Comments & Reviews) (Page 5)


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I grow lettuce, spinach, chives, carrots, peas, sugar peas, potatoes, tomatoes, strawberries, blueberries, cilantro, rosemary, currents, rhubarb, swiss chard, green beans, basil, flat leaf parsley, squash of all kinds, corn, tomatillos, onions, sage, apples, kiwi, raspberries, and hopefully - added this year, cherries and artichokes. I freeze, preserve or can whatever I can and we try to live off the garden year-round. I do, however, run out of most things by about this time every year, so with the addition of a tractor, this year, we're doubleing the size of our garden - I can't wait!!

We also gather clams and mushrooms, and fish when we can. The kids hunt grouse and we are currently feasting on an elk who so graciously gave his life for our family. We make our own bread and whole wheat flour tortillas (unfortunatley from store-purchased flours). We buy tuna off the boat and can about 90 pounds per year. We press our apples and can/freeze apple cider. I would love to live totally "grocery-free," but haven't gotten to that point yet.

We make a little celebration conversation most nights at our table discussing what we have on our plate that was never at the store or on a delivery truck. Most nights we are lucky to say a vast majority of our food was grown, gathered, purchased locally, or at the very least, homemade (from store-bought ingredients).

P.S. I work 30 hours a week and my husband works full-time plus (we own our own small company). I guess we're able to do it, because it is important to us to know the hows, whens, wheres and whats of what we are feeding our family and we really enjoy it. Oh, I forgot to mention, we brew our own beer, too (yummo!).

Anonymous

04/09/2010 - 6:33pm

In my area, it gets fairly hot in the summertime. I make sure my herbs have lots of sun and water, and this makes them very hardy. I use them all summer in salads, marinades, pestos, etc. Then I plant a vegetable garden and compost along with that. Keeps the insects away, and things just taste better. In this economy, it truly pays to grow your own!

Anonymous

04/07/2010 - 10:17am

I started two years ago with a potted herb garden; last year I added peppers, lettuce and radishes to the potted garden. I recently moved to a new location with a very nice sized yard, so this year I will be setting up raised beds for next year. However I still plan to have a potted herb garden and will assist some friends of mine with their garden until I can get mine going. What I can't grow I will pick up from local growers through the farmer's market.

Anonymous

04/07/2010 - 10:02am

We grow herbs-lavender, greek basil, large leaf basil, italian parsley, curled parsley, sage, dill, rosemary, and thyme. AS well cherry tomatoes, beef steak tomatoes, green, red, yellow peppers, corn, butter crunch lettuce, kale, spinach, zuchinni, yellow squash, carrots, onions, chives, black berries, strawberries, and black raspberries, jack be little pumpkins.It saves a ton of money and is quite rewarding. We enjoy our garden so much that we have become spoiled in the sense that we no longer enjoy store bought produce and herbs. We would love to add chickens but our township won't allow agriculture animals even though we live in a very rural area.

Anonymous

04/06/2010 - 7:46pm

Many foods have onions, bell pepper or eggs can I use other items for these family has food allergies. We cannot eat these items and it seems every recipe has one of these 3 items in it???

Anonymous

04/06/2010 - 4:21pm

We live in Florida and grow tomatoes and herbs as the heat allows. Although we're both busy with full-time jobs so the task of managing a full garden is not possible now, we always have rosemary and basil in pots. There's nothing like a home-grown tomato for flavor, and same for fresh herbs, which cost a fortune at the market. My kids are very adventurous eaters because we've exposed them to all types of cuisine from the time they were babies and I ground our dinners in a food processor instead of buying baby food!

Anonymous

04/06/2010 - 2:31pm

I have a very tiny space. Most of it does not get enough sun. I grow butternut squash. The vines are short, they store well ALL winter and I love Indian dishes with "pumpkin". In the rest of the space I plant parsley, thai basil, "regular" basil and rapini. I use the herbs in quantities like vegetables. Some years I plant chard, collards, and dill. From the space the size of a dining table, I have improved my standard of living!

Anonymous

04/03/2010 - 10:14am

For most of the past 30 years, my husband and I grew everything we ate. During that time, the only thing I 'bought' was flour (and sometimes even ground my own) and sugar. The words we lived by were, "if we don't grow it, we don't eat it". Our lives have changed and for the past about 5 years we only grow a few things, tomatoes, beans, zucchini, chard, always garlic, and a few more. I can't say enough about how much I DISLIKE buying vegetables in the store. Who knows what was used on them, how were they processed, etc. And the biggest problem is the taste. They have little. We've already finished last years potatoes so we bought some at the grocery - well they are sitting on the kitchen counter waiting to be taken back to the store! They taste terrible. What was done to ruin a potato? I donno, but we can't eat them! We're in our late 60's maybe when we stop running around and stay home we will have a big garden again. It is the best way to eat!!!

Anonymous

04/02/2010 - 9:12pm

I have herbs in a bed close to the house. With our mild winters I can keep them producing all winter and have the fresh taste of herbs all year. Chives, 3 types of parsley, rosemary, oregano, thyme, garlic, and basil are the ones I use the most. This year I'm going to add one or two tomato plants and some peppers.

Anonymous

04/02/2010 - 4:26pm

I grow tomatoes,eggplant,cucumbers, zucchini, yellow squash,string beans,swiss chard and many herbs. I freeze what I don't eat right away and share some with my neighbors.

floinct

04/02/2010 - 3:55pm

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