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Do You Grow Any of the Food You Eat? (Comments & Reviews) (Page 2)


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Cleared an area of trees, they died from years of wisteria vine strangulation (Piney Wood of East Texas) My garden is on a sloping hill and soil is sandy with years of rotting leaves.
I've planted tomatoes,squash,cucumbers,green and yellow beans,bell peppers , eggplant,chives. and enjoy mint,parsley, cilantro, rosemary, basil and thyme both in the garden area and outside the kitchen door in containers.
The novel aspect of the garden is the "fairy fence" that I constructed to keep my dogs out.
As mentioned, this area was inundated with a variety of vines on the trees, wisteria being the most lethal to the trees, I cut roots, vines and ended up with a byproduct that I use to weave in and out of the upright posts . My garden is very "green". The only manufactured part of my garden are the upright posts (they can be re-used) and the tomato cages that I resorted to due to the winds we get in Texas.
I love my little garden and get just enough sun to grow the veggies we enjoy all summer long.
Sometimes ingenuity and budget get the creative juices flowing and we create a little gem of a garden that provides us with nutritional benefits and much joy!...........When I go into a nursey I can't believe the price of wisteria ! I've probably destroyed $ 10,000.00 worth, some of it with vines 8 to 10 inches around.. , Let me just say that wisteria has no pace in a forest !! From the Pennsylvanian transplant in the Piney Woods of East Texas.

Anonymous

04/29/2010 - 12:15am

You asked many, many questions about us but not the most important one.

DO YOU CHECK TO SEE THE COUNTRY SOURCE OF ITEMS IN YOUR GROCERY STORE?

MY ANSWER IS YES, AND I MAKE A POINT OF ONLY PURCHING ITEMS FROM THE U.S. EXCEPT
FOR PAPAYA (MEXICO) BANANAS(PANAMA), COFFEE (BRAZIL) AND A FEW ITEMS FROM AUSTRAILIA - MOSTLY LAMB. NEVER FROM MEXICO, OR THE ORIENT.

THIS IS IMPORTANT. VERY IMPORTANT FOR YOUR HEALTH.

In fact I usually collect all the items from the orient in a separate basket and give them to
the manager.....I tell him why I won't purchase them and let them return them all to the shelves.
I make it a point.

Anonymous

04/28/2010 - 6:47pm

I live in an apartment but still grow peppers, tomatoes, chives and cucumbers in a topsy turvey planter. Nothing tastes as good as a tomato fresh from the garden, that is if mom doesn't get it first...

Anonymous

04/28/2010 - 3:32pm

Even in the winter in Vermont I grow herbs in the window and arugula under a grow light.

Anonymous

04/28/2010 - 10:32am

I have 10 acres in the country and only grow a few tomatoes and peppers. SHAME on me! Every year my husband says he is going to plow the pasture and plant massive amounts of corn. (He never does!)
I grow alot of different herbs on my patio. SO convenient to just walk out and cut some herbs!

Anonymous

04/28/2010 - 8:21am

We do our best to grow our own, tomatos and vegetables--weather, bugs and "critters" pemiting.
Every one here seems to be Anonymous--wonder why that is? Judy

Anonymous

04/27/2010 - 5:02pm

Yes I do, tomatoes,yellow squash, bananna peppers, green beans, and okra.

Anonymous

04/27/2010 - 4:38pm

yummmmmmmmmyyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!

Anonymous

04/27/2010 - 4:37am

I have my "outside" garden with tomatoes, eggplant, green & yellow beans, radishes, carrots, bell & hot peppers, several sqaushes, cukes, kale, chard, spinach, rosemary, oregano, thyme, basil, cilantro, parsley, melons, and a variey of edible flowers.
I also keep an "inside" garden going, which is hydrophonic - I have 2 Aerogardens. These, or other similar products are perfest for those of you who don't have anywhere to grow a garden. I keep lettuce and herbs going year-round in these tabletop growers.

Anonymous

04/25/2010 - 8:42am

My husband Carl and I (Roberta) have been organic gardeners since the early l980's. Everything we use in our garden is organic right down to making our own soil. I started my tomatoe plants in early April, so they are screaming to go into the ground. We put l or 2 in, to see if we already beat the frost. If not, we'll cover them up. It's well worth it in the end. In Pittsburgh, you never know!
Carl&Roberta.

Anonymous

04/23/2010 - 10:47pm

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