Advertisement

What's So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?

By Joyce Hendley, May/June 2009

The truth behind the buzz about this controversial sweetener.


READER'S COMMENT:
"Good article. It's unfortunate that some people refuse to see any other possible interpretations of facts besides what they have already chosen to believe. "
COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

"[...]from 1970 to 1990 Americans’ intake of HFCS increased by more than 1,000 percent. The researchers also noted that, during that same time, the proportion of Americans who were overweight or obese increased from about half to two-thirds."

While I do believe that HFCS may indeed contribute to weight gain, I doubt it's the only factor. The average American consumes far too much sugar in general (from all sources), along with too much salt and saturated fat. Food additives could definitely be a factor in the increase in Americans' waistlines, but so could the huge portions served up in American restaurants (which increased dramatically between 1970 and 1990, by the way).

Anonymous

09/11/2010 - 1:22am

I agree that both forms of sugar are not good for you if consumed in excess and that should be the focal point, but insufficient research has been conducted to make strong conclusions about whether or not HFCS and table sugar have the same effects on human health. I was saddened that you still have not discussed this recent article showing increased obesity in rats fed a diet with hfcs vs sugar, even when caloric intake of each type of sugar did not differ:

http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/

More research is needed on this issue. But I agree that the take-home should be to reduce consumption of refined sugars, whatever the source. HFCS is currently the main source of these sugars in the common american diet and is very hard to avoid if you buy anything pre-made in the supermarket. These products are designed to addict us by adding large quantities of fats and sugars (usually from corn and soy, produced in an ecologically destructive manner). We all need to eat less pre-made food products and more actual food.

Anonymous

09/29/2010 - 1:45pm

I'm not a person that's stares at the food labels and think oh god I don't want that. It has evil things. Naughty. Recently there has been commercials about corn syrup and that is the same as sugar. Logically it makes sense so I found this article and find it very informative.

I just find it funny that people get caught up on this is bad. That is bad. I'm heavier then I used to be because they make food with evil ingredients. And who paid eatwell to write this. First - stop blaming mfgs for your food choices and how your body has changed. You made the choice to buy it. Eat it. Etc. No one forces us to do it. Not everything is a conspiracy. Make the choice that is right for you. If that means learning to cook so be it. (taste better anyway).

Anyway - nice article. Take from it what you will. Limit your sugar is others said and who cares if your 6 yr is bonkers! That's what kids do. Balls of energy with or without sugar! Be happy you have choices of food and not wondering where your next meal might come. I'm going to finish my Mt. Dew. And yah. I'm 5'11" and weight 170. Toned and happy about it. But still eat garbage sometimes. Happy about.

Anonymous

12/11/2011 - 7:20pm

I love all of you people that are smart enough to understand that, this entire article is a sham, provided by a company that creates sugar for a living. It makes me think there is hope out there. <3

Anonymous

04/25/2012 - 3:32pm

All you need to do is drink a cola made with cane sugar and one that is not and you can taste the difference. It doesn't matter to me whether HFCS is bad for me, I just don't like it as much as sugar. Do your own taste test - most supermarkets in MN have glass bottles of coke meant for distribution in Mexico that use cane sugar, so I am assuming that will be the case across most of the U.S.

Anonymous

08/11/2013 - 6:41pm

Good article. It's unfortunate that some people refuse to see any other possible interpretations of facts besides what they have already chosen to believe.

Anonymous

04/25/2014 - 10:38am



20 minute dinner recipes
Advertisement
more smart savings
Advertisement
20 minute dinner recipes
Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner