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New Science Links Food and Happiness

By Rachael Moeller Gorman, "Captain of the Happier Meal," May/June 2010

Joe Hibbeln, M.D., believes our diet is making us depressed, addicted and violent. He thinks he’s found a simple solution.


READER'S COMMENT:
"I believe in Joe Hibbeln 's work, it should be actively promoted. A UK study by Nick Fisher of the effects of a one- month high Omega-3 diet on a prison population showed mood improvement. The charismatic wit and humour of both Nick and...
COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

I believe in Joe Hibbeln 's work, it should be actively promoted. A UK study by Nick Fisher of the effects of a one- month high Omega-3 diet on a prison population showed mood improvement. The charismatic wit and humour of both Nick and Joe in conveying their findings makes a crucial difference in the general public adopting healthy habits instead of ignoring statistical data.
In the UK supermarkets and convenience stores there is a distinct shortage of high-nutrient unprocessed umrefined foods, tv advertising still promoting junk food as aspirational. Popular tv shows scorn the inevitable product of a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle whilst avoiding stating the cause, perhaps for fear of legal cases brought by the fast food giants?

Anonymous

11/02/2013 - 7:28am

Omega 3 is not the only cause of good or bad mood. Genetics plays an important role. Without a doubt, Omega 3 is quite important for one´s health, but one must also remember a few other causes that influence one´s health: lifestyle, genes, environment, social relationship, exercising your body (very important) etc. Many other types of food (plants included) give you the amino-acids that your brain needs to build those important neurotransmitters related to mood. Just think, for instance of those vegetarian monks. No one is depressed (as long as I know). Happiness or depression (or whatever) is always influenced by many factors and science comes in handy to put together all the pieces of the puzzle (the results of research). Just like any other aspect (of life) that you may consider, your health is a multi-factorial phenomenon, not a single-cause one. Thanks for reading and... keep eating fish, it´s good for your health!.

Gold

01/07/2013 - 12:25am

I second the nomination! Once the world wakes up and recognizes the value of Dr. Hibbeln's work he's likely to get one. There is no easier, more cost-effective way to improve the collective mental and physical health of our population and reduce health care costs than by recognizing and promoting his simple, inexpensive dietary prescription: fewer omega-6s and more omega-3s. All health begins and ends at the cellular level, and every cell--heart, eye, skin and brain--needs long-chain omega-3s to function properly.

Anonymous

06/28/2010 - 4:01pm

Dr. Hibbeln's work is important. He's only trying to get our off-track diet back to where we were a couple of generations ago. To change the Omega-3 to Omega-6 ratios so dramatically and not expect any physiological and psychological fall out is naive.

Any shift back will help. First step should be Less Omega-6 then more seafood consumption and finally pharmaceutical grade fish oil supplements.

Here is an article on what the military is doing to help our soldiers suffering from Omega-3 deficiency: http://www.omegavia.com/uncle-sam-fish-oil-benefits/

Anonymous

05/31/2010 - 7:46pm

Dr. Hibbeln's work is among the most important in the world. I personally know this guy as a fellow scientist. He is brilliant and fun (as the picture shows). This work can radically change the health of America. I nominate Joe Hibbeln for a Nobel Prize in Medicine.

dde

04/23/2010 - 11:22pm



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