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Molybdenum

Grains

What does it do?

Molybdenum is a mineral that serves as a part of several key enzymes that help the body use carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

What are the best food sources?

Major food sources of molybdenum include legumes, grain products and nuts. Fruits, many vegetables and most animal products are usually low in molybdenum.

What happens if you don’t get enough?

It’s not likely you’ll need to worry about whether you are getting enough of this mineral. Deficiency has not been observed in healthy people.

What happens if you get too much?

Harmful effects from too much molybdenum are quite uncommon. This could be because the mineral is rapidly excreted when consumed at high levels. Because so few cases have been reported, it’s hard for scientists to identify harmful effects and their symptoms. Still, stay within the recommended intakes.

How much do you need?

The following table lists the recommended intake for healthy people based on current scientific information.

Life Stage Group Age Range Recommended Dietary Allowance/Adequate Intake Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL)
Infants 0-6 mo. Not determinable for infants due to lack of data on adverse effects in this age group and concern about inability to handle excess amounts. Source should be from food only to prevent high levels of intake.
Infants 7-12 mo. Not determinable for infants due to lack of data on adverse effects in this age group and concern about inability to handle excess amounts. Source should be from food only to prevent high levels of intake.
Children 1-3 yr. 300 micrograms/day
Children 4-8 yr. 600 micrograms/day
Males 9-13 yr. 1100 micrograms/day
Males 14-18 yr. 1700 micrograms/day
Males 19-30 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Males 31-50 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Males 51-70 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Males > 70 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Females 9-13 yr. 1100 micrograms/day
Females 14-18 yr. 1700 micrograms/day
Females 19-30 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Females 31-50 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Females 51-70 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Females 51-70 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Females > 70 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Pregnancy < 18 yr. 1700 micrograms/day
Pregnancy 19-30 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Lactation < 18 yr. 1700 micrograms/day
Lactation 19-30 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
Lactation 31-50 yr. 2000 micrograms/day
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