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Q. Can Drinking Seltzers, Sodas or Other Carbonated Drinks Harm Bones?

By Joyce Hendley, May/June 2008

Can Drinking Seltzers, Sodas or Other Carbonated Drinks Harm Bones?

A. Perhaps. There’s research that links drinking certain types of soda with weaker bones—but carbonation doesn’t seem to be the problem.

Nutrition experts once believed caffeine could be the culprit. In a 2001 study out of Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, people lost measurable amounts of calcium after drinking caffeinated sodas. Drinking decaffeinated sodas didn’t appear to have the same effect. As it turned out, though, people tended to make up for the losses by excreting less calcium later in the day. The researchers concluded that if sodas harm bones it’s probably because people drink them in place of milk.

But another study, reported in 2006 by researchers at Tufts University in Boston, suggests that colas, specifically, might be problematic. Among the 1,413 women whose dietary records and bone-density scans they reviewed, those who drank a diet or regular cola at least three times a week over five years had significantly lower bone densities than those who sipped cola once a month or less. No such effect occurred with other carbonated drinks, even after researchers factored in intake of calcium from foods.

The likely cause? Phosphoric acid, which is unique to colas, says Katherine Tucker, Ph.D., lead author of the study. When the body breaks down this compound, the acidity (or concentration of free hydrogen ions) of the blood increases. To neutralize acidity, hydrogen ions bind with minerals, including calcium and magnesium. If they’re not available in the blood, says Tucker, “the body draws calcium from bones.” The occasional cola drinker probably needn’t worry. “The real risk is for those who drink cola every day,” says Tucker.

Bottom line: There are plenty of good reasons to quit a regular soda habit; carbonation isn’t one of them. In fact, sparkling mineral waters sometimes contain a little calcium and magnesium, says Tucker, “so they might even benefit bones.”

COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

Acid foods = stores fat on body as your body stores Acid in the fat to stop you getting to Alkaline so Alkaline foods you will lose fat to release we eat to much Acid food to day we are getting to fat.
lemons go Alkaline in the body so some foods you think are Acid may not be look them up.
Orange juice has more sugar then coke the list go's on know what you are eating
Acid high body's breed Cancer and they say it takes 33 classes of water to bring you back from a glass of coke next time you think of having a coke
Happy eating

Anonymous

01/24/2013 - 5:29pm

Acid foods = stores fat on body as your body stores Acid in the fat to stop you getting to Alkaline so Alkaline foods you will lose fat to release we eat to much Acid food to day we are getting to fat.
lemons go Alkaline in the body so some foods you think are Acid may not be look them up.
Orange juice has more sugar then coke the list go's on know what you are eating
Acid high body's breed Cancer and they say it takes 33 classes of water to bring you back from a glass of coke next time you think of having a coke
Happy eating

Anonymous

01/24/2013 - 5:27pm

Carbonated water (also known as club soda, soda water, sparkling water, seltzer water, or fizzy water) is water into which carbon dioxide has been dissolved, a process that causes the water to become effervescent.

The CO2 bubbles in sparkling water or in any carbonated drink can be man-made by either of two processes.
One process leaves lots of sodium in your drink. The other process leaves you drinking no sodium.
The first process creates “club soda.” The second process creates “seltzer water.”

Each of these is bubbly water or fizzy water but for some people, the first process can mean extra weight because the salt or sodium causes some people to retain water in their systems. This is why some doctors tell people with high blood pressure that sodium is not good for them.

When you think of club soda, think of the fizz in Alka Seltzer. Alka Selter is aspirin plus Bicarbonate of Soda or Sodium Bicarbonate (NaHCO3). Bicarbonate of Soda plus water creates CO2 plus NaCl. NaCl (Sodium Chloride) is the same as common table salt. Both the CO2 and the NaCl are dissolved in the water. Eventually (unless pressure is applied to keep the CO2 pressed into the water, the CO2 bubbles out (becomes undissolved) of the liquid. Then the liquid contains aspirin and salt. You drink it and hopefully feel better. Of course, you could have swallowed an aspirin followed by a drink of ordinary water and you would have avoided the salt as well as the CO2

When you think of Seltzer Water, think of those old time reusable spritzer bottles you see in the Roaring 20’s movies that were used for putting a shot of the “soda” into a scotch and soda. It wasn’t really soda but scotch and seltzer. This type of carbonated water is made by inserting a disposable cartridge of compressed CO2 into a closed bottle of water. The bottle is a pressure vessel with a release valve and spout for dispensing the carbonated water. The pressure forces the CO2 to dissolve in the water and voilà, you have bubbly (or seltzer or carbonated or fizzy) water without the NaCl.

When CO2 bubbles out, this is similar to boiling water where the air dissolved in water becomes undissolved (unless it is kept in a container such as a pressure cooker).

Look on your soft drink label to see which process the bottler used to make the “soda pop” you are drinking – with sodium or without sodium. Diet Rite Cola, for example, advertises no caffeine, no calories and no salt. Its process for making the carbonated water uses the process of forcing CO2 into water. Diet Coca-Cola with no calories comes in two varieties – with caffeine and without caffeine. However each version has sodium from the process that created the carbonated water.

Because few of us can taste any difference between carbonated water made from these two different manufacturing processes, some suggest that it would be more healthy or less unhealthy if soft drink manufacturers used the non-salt manufacturing process. At some point, watch for health food advocates to begin pressing restaurants to dispense only non-salt soft drinks.

Salty Dog

Anonymous

01/11/2013 - 5:39pm

my phylosophy: life is short eat everything drink everything, becuase soon enough your gonna get diabetes and have a restricted diet the rerst of your now miserable life. so eat and be happy and realize were all gonna die one day, might as well die happy or be misarable and diet to try to live longer and wind up dyeing before your time any way of a heart attack cuz you never thought it could happen to you. (being in the best shape you ever been).there is a reason dibetes has quadrupled and its not from the suger or high fructose corn syrup, it's because our foods are mostly preservatives. any one wanna guess how much food is grown in our countyand packaged FRESH? not as much as you think most of everything we eat (especially packaged) has gone about 1500 miles before you buy it at the store, and if it's friuts or vegatables add so pestasides for more nutrition. so I'm have embraced my mortality and I know I will die but I'm going down happy. junck food yeah, its my vice not alcohol not drugs, not ciarettes, little debbies! and cola

food for thought lol! E. nigma

Anonymous

12/08/2012 - 6:35am

Congress is taking too much liberty and telling us what to eat and drink. They are getting too engrossed in our liberties. Big brother is coming !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous

07/05/2012 - 4:09pm

...said the Health Nut Nazi. Anybody hear about something called moderation? Nothing against healthy foods and salads with lite dressing and carrots and whole grains and steel-cut oats. It's been my experience, however, that the word 'organic' translates in the real world to mean: 'much more expensive, with a negligible, if not dubious, nutritive boost.'
I also like the occasional steak (6 ozs., not 16) or slice of pizza (not four). We shouldn't cheat ourselves of good flavor, but the trick is knowing when to quit. Do exercise that you enjoy doing, not some ball-busting marathon! I like to ride a road bike, and that's something I enjoy which is also good for my knees, heart, wind, what have you.
And every once in awhile, I get a 2-liter bottle of caffeine-free diet Coke, and twice a year (Father's Day and my birthday) I buy a gallon of whole milk instead of the usual skim. And I play with my grandchildren. Enjoy all of life, and don't make yourself a slave to some illusion of "perfect" health.

Anonymous

06/19/2012 - 12:57pm

It's all BAD! The only thing that's good for the body
is food that's straight from the earth.
Fruits, vegetables & herbs & yes we can
get plenty of amino acids from this diet. If
everyone ate this diet most all diseases
would fade away & people would die
only of old age. Soda of any sort is
not natural & definitely not nutritious, but if you want to keep
consuming it no one is going to stop you.

Anonymous

03/28/2012 - 10:13pm

I own a beverage company here in Boulder, Colorado. Periodically, the question of “Is carbonation ok for me?” comes up in our emails. The question always stems from two concerns that have been floating around the Internet:
1. Does carbonated water weaken bones or leach minerals?
2. Does carbonated water have too much sodium?
On bones: there isn’t a shread of scientific evidence that points to carbonated water having any effect, at all, on bones. Nor is there any conceivable means by which it could. Carbonation is simply carbon dioxide—CO2—which is a natural and extremely important part of human biology; it is our main way of balancing internal pH.
It is believed that the original fear around bone loss and fizzy drinks came from an ingredient used in some cokes and sodas, called phosphorous. Phosphorous may in fact leach calcium from the body. But many fizzy drinks don’t contain a speck of it. More importantly, it has nothing to do with the carbonation. Again, carbonation is simply CO2 gas. Nothing else.
On excess sodium: again, there’s no correlation at all with carbonated water and sodium. There is zero sodium in most fizzy drinks.
The original question was more about sodas and pops in general. But since the question often revolves around the safety of the bubbles, I wanted to point out that carbonation is nothing more than carbon dioxide, something we produce every time we breath. It doesn’t leach minerals and it doesn’t contain salt.

bt_1

08/02/2010 - 7:14pm

My handy man only drinks around 3 glasses of water a year(yes year).He drinks 3 cans of coke every day no lunch...One glass of orange juice for breakfast and a full supper whatever his wife cooks....he is 75 years and fitter then a 25 year old and was never sick in his life....I guess coke really add life...LOL...Me on the other I just have to look at soda and I pick up weight...I guess its all in the genetics .....I stopped drinking soda for 2 months and substituted it with water just tap(no bottle) and guess what I lost no weight so I;m back on soda.Whats the use of living if you cant enjoy the a little bit of soda ..besides everything is organic..It all comes from our planet weather they make it in the lab or not all the ingredients are from mother earth.....Long live the soda revolution...LOL

Anonymous

07/17/2010 - 3:44pm

My mother-in-law drinks a lot of coke. She died last year at the age of 91.

Anonymous

07/10/2010 - 11:37am

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