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Do You Grow Any of the Food You Eat?


Yes! [Anything from herbs to chickens.]
78% (976 votes)
No, I don't have the time/space/money.
13% (167 votes)
I'm planning to start this season.
8% (105 votes)
Total votes: 1248
Gardening Tips, How-To and Recipes

65 comments

Anonymous wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

This year I am using fresh

This year I am using fresh herbs grown myself.

I grew gourdes,tomatoes,beetroot this year.
The rosemary is outside,growing really well.

growing my own is brilliant,I love it.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

If you don't grow anything

If you don't grow anything else you must try growing your own herbs! Its easy and they just simply multiply without you having to do a thing but water them and oregano doesn't even need that!
It's amazing how these plants last, especially oregano and rosemary. They are woody so they do withstand the winter & the hot summer sun, at least here in Central Florida.
Oregano makes a really pretty ground cover too, and because the limbs grow out along the ground it creates roots along the branches simply to "replant" itself making more plants. I gave one to my daughter.
And basil if you clip it, just stick a 6" or so branch in a glass of water and watch the roots begin to grow and you have another plant! or as many branches as you want to stick in a glass of water.
I also grow thyme, mint, marjoram, sage, & parsley. Both sage and parsley were started from seeds.
Its so much fun and convinent to clip whatever you need before you cook! Love it!
You can grow these in pots too, just be careful not to overwater them. No fertilizing either.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

If you don't grow anything

If you don't grow anything else you must try growing your own herbs! Its easy and they just simply multiply without you having to do a thing but water them and oregano doesn't even need that!
It's amazing how these plants last, especially oregano and rosemary. They are woody so they do withstand the winter & the hot summer sun, at least here in Central Florida.
Oregano makes a really pretty ground cover too, and because the limbs grow out along the ground it creates roots along the branches simply to "replant" itself making more plants. I gave one to my daughter.
And basil if you clip it, just stick a 6" or so branch in a glass of water and watch the roots begin to grow and you have another plant! or as many branches as you want to stick in a glass of water.
I also grow thyme, mint, marjoram, sage, & parsley. Both sage and parsley were started from seeds.
Its so much fun and convinent to clip whatever you need before you cook! Love it!
You can grow these in pots too, just be careful not to overwater them. No fertilizing either.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

We grow cherry, Roma, &

We grow cherry, Roma, & another tomatoes, brussel sprouts (which gave us very good yield), Romaine lettuce, cucs are coming in now, pole beans (nice yield), collard greens, radishes, broccoli (very good yield), a really big Butternut Squash (came up from our compost ,with some more on the vine), walermelons & cantelopes are now coming up.
Growing a garden is not too hard once you get the ground dug and prepared, then it just means watering & fertiliingr). I usually use Miracle Grow and it does makes a difference in the yield and the size of the bush as well. I did an experiment on the pole beans applying some with the MG and left the others alone and by far there is definitely more beans where the MG was applied.
We had a really nice winter garden, but here in Central Florida it getting so hot now that we are heading into mid-summer months that we will wait and see how different bushes outlast the heat & sun.
We love gardening! I think our yard has the most flowers of anyone along our road! Beautiful!

Anonymous wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I started my own vegetable

I started my own vegetable garden this year. After a lot of digging and compost incorporation, as well as using some grow bags this year, we are finally seeing some results.
I am growing a few varieties, from tomatoes, beans, peas and lettuce, to potatoes and carrots. We also planted some fruit bushes for good measure.
With the price of fruit and vegetables sky rocketing in the supermarkets, it seems to make sense. My feeling is growing at least some of our own food could save us money in the long term.
It's also very satisfying and rather good for the health.

 
imcpar wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

It's Too Soon to form an

It's Too Soon to form an opinion, but I hope it will save me some money on vegetables this summer. The prices and costs per piece/package/pound/unit now are significantly higher than what they were compared to the same time last spring and Northeast getting ridiculous here in the Northeastern cities.

I truly hope that those TOMATO TREES work and those other gimmicky vegetables work that you see on TV.

 
imcpar wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Too Soon to form an opinion,

Too Soon to form an opinion, but I hope it will save me some money on vegetables this summer. The costs per piece now is what it was per pound last spring and Northeare getting ridiculous here in the Northeastern cities.

I truly hopre that those TOMATO TREES wo

 
vanessa_1 wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Since I have been using your

Since I have been using your website exclusively for recipes this year I added Bok Choy and Swiss Chard to my garden.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

I raise organic herbs and

I raise organic herbs and vegetables every year but I can't have chickens in my town.
I share heritage tomato plants with just about anyone so that I can share the joy of gardining
with them and also create new gardeners.

 
Suncrestvineyard wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

I am preparing Chicken

I am preparing Chicken Paprikash tonight.
I added some fresh chopped green garlic to the saute' because it is in season in our garden,and gorgeous!
Our faithful pet hens have kept the garden weeded,de-bugged,and well scratched all winter.None will ever see a pot though!
This dish looks lovely,and for an extra touch,my husband Steve made the pasta himself.He will even clean up after himself :)
Looks fabulous,:)
Leslie

Anonymous wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Yes, we grow our own

Yes, we grow our own vegetables and fruits. We have a huge garden, where we grow a variety of potatoes ( kennebec, pontiac red potatoes, yuckon gold and sweet potatoes) and we store them over the winter. I also can the small whole potatoes which come in handy for fried potatoes. They are very tasty and convenient. We also grow our own asparagus,lettuce, cabbage, spinach, onions, radishes, corn,peas, green beans, beets, green peppers, lots of tomatoes, carrots. Sometimes we grow eggplants and okra, but haven't this year. We also grow blueberries, strawberries, rhurbarb and blackberries. We had in the past had apples and pears but the satorms had blown them down and we did not replace. We also have our own pecan trees.
We love to can and therefore, our vegetables do not go to waste and they taste so much better than the store boughten ones.
We raise our own chickens and therefore have fresh brown eggs every day. After the chickens are past the laying stage, we butcher them for chicken soup and dumplings. Yum yum!! We also can homemade soups, using our vegetables and chicken in the soup.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

We have a yard that's full of

We have a yard that's full of oak trees and only spots with enough sun to support most crop plants, but we today we planted two tomato plants and a new-to-me type of Mexican sweet pepper, and are planning to grow Kentucky Wonder pole beans against the warm and sunny side of our garage. I also planted one arugula and will be succession-planing some arugula seeds, as well as dill, borage, parsley, basil, and thyme. I hope that they will all naturalize in my garden. I have a large rosemary plant that is in its fourth year. I want to find a Tuscan kale plant or seeds and other easy-to-grow green garden veggies that can thrive among our landscape plants.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

As a farmwife/partner I have

As a farmwife/partner I have raised chicken,rabbit,turkey,lamb,beef,pork and most of the vegetables we eat. Canning and freezing are part of our life. If I couldn't get my fingers into soil, I don't know what I would do.
Also worked in town while doing all this for 45 years. Still have started another garden this year at 69.
Keeps me sane. MaryJo

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I grew up with older parents

I grew up with older parents who went thru the depression. We grew and canned all our food. Now I freeze, can, and or dry my foods although some ways might be a little more modern, but I still do it. I really would love a root cellar like my grandparents had in NC. Oh it was a dream and then an underground spring (still working today) was in the next side of the shed type place that lead into the cellar, The only vegetable I buy in the summer is fresh corn on the cob. My husband and I grow all the rest and as I said still put things by. I never grew up wondering where food came from.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I'd love to but I live in a

I'd love to but I live in a 4th floor condo.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Growing our own fruits and

Growing our own fruits and veggies is a hobby that has many benefits. (Our neighbors even enjoy some of the benefits when there's an abundance of produce.) Most of what we can't consume in the summer gets canned or frozen to use during the cold months. I can't imagine life without my garden! It must be healthy for me. I'm in my 60's, and I'm on no medications.
Judy

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Fresh herbs are a necessity -

Fresh herbs are a necessity - parsley, basil, dill, chives, mint, cilantro & arugula. They grow well in a small space or containers. I don't have any right now, and with all of the rain this El Nino year, the snails and slugs number in the thousands! When we're done with our remodel, scheduled for this summer, I'll attempt to plant another round.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

These eating well plans are

These eating well plans are great! It would make it a lot easier if a grocery list could be printed so we don't have to review each recipe and write it down. Just a thought.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

we have several blueberry

we have several blueberry bushes, since blueberries are upwards of 4. pint and have so many good antioxidants and so many good ways to eat, we harvest several gallons a year, also grow our own veg garden for summer salads and winter stews and seasonings, saving money as well as environment

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

there is more to 'grow your

there is more to 'grow your own' than you can imagine. it works, ppl, it works OhSoWell (tm). produce produce on youur front/back porch.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Cleared an area of trees,

Cleared an area of trees, they died from years of wisteria vine strangulation (Piney Wood of East Texas) My garden is on a sloping hill and soil is sandy with years of rotting leaves.
I've planted tomatoes,squash,cucumbers,green and yellow beans,bell peppers , eggplant,chives. and enjoy mint,parsley, cilantro, rosemary, basil and thyme both in the garden area and outside the kitchen door in containers.
The novel aspect of the garden is the "fairy fence" that I constructed to keep my dogs out.
As mentioned, this area was inundated with a variety of vines on the trees, wisteria being the most lethal to the trees, I cut roots, vines and ended up with a byproduct that I use to weave in and out of the upright posts . My garden is very "green". The only manufactured part of my garden are the upright posts (they can be re-used) and the tomato cages that I resorted to due to the winds we get in Texas.
I love my little garden and get just enough sun to grow the veggies we enjoy all summer long.
Sometimes ingenuity and budget get the creative juices flowing and we create a little gem of a garden that provides us with nutritional benefits and much joy!...........When I go into a nursey I can't believe the price of wisteria ! I've probably destroyed $ 10,000.00 worth, some of it with vines 8 to 10 inches around.. , Let me just say that wisteria has no pace in a forest !! From the Pennsylvanian transplant in the Piney Woods of East Texas.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

You asked many, many

You asked many, many questions about us but not the most important one.

DO YOU CHECK TO SEE THE COUNTRY SOURCE OF ITEMS IN YOUR GROCERY STORE?

MY ANSWER IS YES, AND I MAKE A POINT OF ONLY PURCHING ITEMS FROM THE U.S. EXCEPT
FOR PAPAYA (MEXICO) BANANAS(PANAMA), COFFEE (BRAZIL) AND A FEW ITEMS FROM AUSTRAILIA - MOSTLY LAMB. NEVER FROM MEXICO, OR THE ORIENT.

THIS IS IMPORTANT. VERY IMPORTANT FOR YOUR HEALTH.

In fact I usually collect all the items from the orient in a separate basket and give them to
the manager.....I tell him why I won't purchase them and let them return them all to the shelves.
I make it a point.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I live in an apartment but

I live in an apartment but still grow peppers, tomatoes, chives and cucumbers in a topsy turvey planter. Nothing tastes as good as a tomato fresh from the garden, that is if mom doesn't get it first...

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Even in the winter in Vermont

Even in the winter in Vermont I grow herbs in the window and arugula under a grow light.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I have 10 acres in the

I have 10 acres in the country and only grow a few tomatoes and peppers. SHAME on me! Every year my husband says he is going to plow the pasture and plant massive amounts of corn. (He never does!)
I grow alot of different herbs on my patio. SO convenient to just walk out and cut some herbs!

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

We do our best to grow our

We do our best to grow our own, tomatos and vegetables--weather, bugs and "critters" pemiting.
Every one here seems to be Anonymous--wonder why that is? Judy

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Yes I do, tomatoes,yellow

Yes I do, tomatoes,yellow squash, bananna peppers, green beans, and okra.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

yummmmmmmmmyyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!

yummmmmmmmmyyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!

Anonymous wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I have my "outside" garden

I have my "outside" garden with tomatoes, eggplant, green & yellow beans, radishes, carrots, bell & hot peppers, several sqaushes, cukes, kale, chard, spinach, rosemary, oregano, thyme, basil, cilantro, parsley, melons, and a variey of edible flowers.
I also keep an "inside" garden going, which is hydrophonic - I have 2 Aerogardens. These, or other similar products are perfest for those of you who don't have anywhere to grow a garden. I keep lettuce and herbs going year-round in these tabletop growers.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

My husband Carl and I

My husband Carl and I (Roberta) have been organic gardeners since the early l980's. Everything we use in our garden is organic right down to making our own soil. I started my tomatoe plants in early April, so they are screaming to go into the ground. We put l or 2 in, to see if we already beat the frost. If not, we'll cover them up. It's well worth it in the end. In Pittsburgh, you never know!
Carl&Roberta.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I think there are a lot of

I think there are a lot of people lying or the only people that read this website are farmers.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I've started gardening now

I've started gardening now that my mother's health no longer allows her to devote the time or energy it takes to keep the garden (relatively) weed-free. Also, having fresh veggies and canned veggies in the winter is so much better than store-bought canned veggies. The store-bought canned veggies taste tin-y to me and it took tasting fresh beets for me to like them.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I would like to make comment

I would like to make comment on growing your own food.. actually several comments.. I do grow herbs for our use, also container gardening where we presently live-- due to much shade in yard.. We also raise beef cattle.. for breeding stock- and for our food. None of our cattle get added hormones, but they do receive medicine if they need it- just like we gave our children med's or ourselves when needed to get healthy... Our cattle are very well taken care of.. have lots of pasture to feed off of, make our own hay for feed, grow our corn that goes to their feeding... shade trees to lie under if they so desire, shelter if needed. feed two times daily..water available at all times.. and better taken care of them some children I've seen. I do NOT appreciate Eatingwell's - words saying eating no meat for at least one day a week is good for the environment.. that is NOT True.- don't know why/ how you came up w/ this as I couldn't find anything on here to follow up with. I know you have it connected to Earth Day.. but come on??? The good Lord gave us these animals for food... be thankful.. Since I can't find at this time any more on this on your site, I can only assume this was meant for all kinds of meats.. chickens, hogs. I'd be more than happy to read what you have to say if I knew where to look...

I have no problem with eating healthy & I know meat is healthy for you as well as vegetables, fruits, and whole grains .. I don't have to have meat at every meal if I so choose, and that has nothing to do w/ helping the environment and I don't care if someone chooses to not eat meat- its their choice.. but I do take offense when you are telling people its good for the environment to back off of the meat.. Thank you for having the opportunity to speak my thoughts...

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I love growing herbs around

I love growing herbs around my back patio. The chives and oregano last through the winter each year, and come back more beautiful each time. I grow tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini and even watermelon and peppers in the small space not taken up by herbs. Finding the Eating Well website has been a joy, because i look through the recipes and specifically pick out the ones that I can use my fresh herbs and garden bounty in.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

If those who had room to grow

If those who had room to grow things would do so, it would be wonderful.
However many of us live in high rise building with no terrace nor balcony.
Fresh food is the best but not always attainable.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Growing your own vegetables

Growing your own vegetables is relaxing, does not take much time, and saves money over organic selections in the grocery. Plus the vegetables taste better. We know organic, herbicide and pesticide free vegetables are better for us but the cost is often prohibitive and the selection very limited. In a small space, I can grow organic tomatoes, peas, squash, beans, lettuce, kale, eggplant, basil, garlic, shallots, cukes and hot and sweet peppers. The cukes, peas, squash, beans, eggplant, basil, garlic and peppers last all winter - some in the freezer, some pickled, some just stored.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I planted an herb garden by

I planted an herb garden by my back patio door and I just love it there. "Herb-on-demand"....no waste, fresh, totally organic. Fresh herbs at my finger tips.......its' the best.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

We grow a large vegetable

We grow a large vegetable garden as well as many of our herbs. We grow summer and winter squashes, a large variety of tomatoes, green beans, cucumbers, onions, radishes, spinach, chard, lettuces, green and hot peppers, and tomatillos. We also pick the wild blackberries and apples that are in abundance around here. We can get lugs of stone fruit from the eastern side of our state which I freeze and can. My husband and I both can much of what we grow: stewed tomatoes, salsas, dill and bread and butter pickles, chutney, jam, pickled green beans and combination vegetables, zucchini relish. We also freeze a lot including shredded zucchini which I add to soups and sauces--it thickens them without adding a definite squash flavor. I make chocolate zucchini cake and reg. zucchini bread and freeze them as well as freezing cherry tomatoes which I toss into soup, etc. My husband fishes and we fill the freezer with salmon, halibut, and other fish. Our blueberry and raspberry bushes are small still so we don't get much off them at present but will in future years. WE find a few weeks of intensive labor with the preservation of our food adds to our health and pleasure all year long.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

The only thing I plant in the

The only thing I plant in the summer are cherry tomatoes on my patio.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

The only thing I plant in the

The only thing I plant in the summer are cherry tomatoes on my patio.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Most of the people in this

Most of the people in this world would be healthier and happier if they grew some of the items they eat. A window sill for city folks or a plot of land for those in the 'burbs or country. I live in Cyprus and seemingly everyone grows some item that they eat. Food tastes much better when it is fresh and, if possible, organic.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Fresh vegetables from the

Fresh vegetables from the garden taste better than store bought!

Anonymous wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I started growing herbs about

I started growing herbs about 30 years ago to use instead of salt. All but dill and basil will grow in Atlanta even during the winter. I had fresh sage when there was 3 inches of snow in my yard.

Never water your herbs--the flavor is more concentrated if you don't. I freeze herbs instead of drying them. Love thyme and bought a packet of seed as 5 plants was not enough for me all winter long; had to buy some. I put fresh thyme in a ziplock freezer bag just like that--and pull out a few sprigs when I need some. I also make herb "ice cubes" in a silicone muffin pan because they are easy to pop out./

Fill the sections with chopped or minced herbs. Cover with water and freeze. Be sure to store like kinds of ice cubes together. When you need fresh dill in potato soup, just put 1-3 ice cubes in your soup for a fresh summer flavor.

I also make a lot of pesto; being allergic to pine nuts, I use pecans. I freeze it in the silicone muffin pan for nice patties of pesto that are nice to put on lots of food. I froze about 1 quart of it last year and will increase that to 1 1/2 quarts this season.

I make herb vinegar like my Grandmother taught me. Fill a glass bottle with fresh dill and cover it with white vinegar. Let it set at least a month before using. I use fishing corks @ 15¢ each instead of paying $2 for 1 or 2 at a cooing store--same thing. Purple basil makes a pretty pink vinegar and is nice for salads. I also make a mixture with garlic cloves, herbs, whole black pepper corns, and hot pepper flakes.

My sage and rosemary are blooming now; and I see several recipes in the new Eating Well magazine that came yesterday. A charter subscriber and love it.

 
sherrel53 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I make my own spagetti sauce

I make my own spagetti sauce and rote,l canned tomaotes, marinara, tomato juice. I freeze jalapenos green peppers and red peppers. All of this from growing a small 6 row garden consisting of roma tomatoes, green and red peppers and onions. I also try to grow a few heads of cabbage. I usually have enough for my daughter and her five children and several neighbors and I make a few gift basket with a meal of sauce, noodles and a loaf of bread. very simple. it will last from one harvest to the next and it is so much fun I ca hardly wait from one season to the next.I also make salsa for the grandkids. they like it hot

Anonymous wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I am quite impressed with

I am quite impressed with people that 'grow' stuff...Me? Never...That is what the produce aisle is for at my local market...

Anonymous wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

We grow our own--lots of

We grow our own--lots of veggies, herbs. I try to freeze as much as we don't eat. Our local farmer's market helps me fill in the gaps. I love the months that go by when I don't have to go near the produce section of the store. Now, if I could just raise chickens...pigs....salmon??? Probably not, and I don't seem to be able to give up meat completely.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I gave up vegetable gardening

I gave up vegetable gardening when I worked full time. However I always have an herb garden. Even though we are moving to a retirement community, I still plan to have some herbs. They can really make a differnce whe adding fresh herbs to a dish.
Lorraine W.

Anonymous wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I grow everything I can. A

I grow everything I can. A lot of it goes to feed the deer, quail and rabbits that reside in my back yard! Seriously, I love to grow a garden, and can't wait to till this weekend so I can get started with my early spring crop of spinach and peas. Yum!

Anonymous wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

One of my favorite aspects of

One of my favorite aspects of the warm seasons is the food we get from our garden: tomatoes, squash, herbs, peppers, beans, okra, and cucumbers. I love to can and preserve our harvest so I can open a fresh jar of tomatoes in mid-winter!

Anonymous wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

We grow tomatoes, peppers,

We grow tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, beans, squash (zucchini, summer, patty pan, and spaghetti), leeks, oriental beens, herbs, and lavender. We also have many wild high-bush blueberry bushes. What we can't eat during the growing season, I put up for the winter. I make jam from the blueberries and freeze some of them.

A neighbor gives me some of his surplus grapes and pears, and I can the pears and make jelly. I also pick crab apples from the trees where I work, and make crab apple jelly.

My mother taught me canning and I thank her every day for this skill. My daughter-in-law has taken an interest in it, and I am thrilled to be able to pass the skills along to her.

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