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Pomegranates Healthy Food Guide

Peak season: Fall and Winter

 

High in fiber, vitamin C and potassium, pomegranates are also high in polyphenols, a type of antioxidant that has been linked with reduced risk of heart disease and some cancers.

Beneath the tough, leathery skin of a pomegranate, you will find hundreds of edible seeds encased in sweet, juicy pulp. Native to the region from Iran to northern India, pomegrantes have been appreciated from Biblical times, when Moses promised his followers that they would find the fruit in the Promised Land, to the 18th century, when Spanish sailors introduced it to the southern United States.

What you get

High in fiber, vitamin C and potassium, pomegranates are also high in polyphenols, a type of antioxidant that has been linked with reduced risk of heart disease and some cancers.

Tips

Shopping Tips
Look for pomegranates that feel heavy for their size, indicating particularly juicy fruit.
Pomegranates are picked ripe, so the fruit is ready to enjoy when you buy it.
Pomegranates should have soft, leathery skin that gives slightly when pressed; avoid fruit with shriveled skin.
Storage Tips
Store pomegranates at room temperature for up to 3 weeks or refrigerate for up to 2 months.
Pomegranate seeds and juice can be frozen for up to 6 months.

Fun Fact

The pomegranate has made numerous appearances in religious literature and some scholars believe that the pomegranate was the original “forbidden fruit.”

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