Advertisement

5 Secrets for Baking Healthier Cookies (Page 5)

Add Fiber To Your Cookies

3. Add Fiber To Your Cookies

Try replacing some (or all) of the all-purpose flour with whole-wheat flour, whole-wheat pastry flour and/or oats. If you are used to the taste and texture of whole-wheat, some cookies are just as satisfying when made with 100% whole-wheat flour. Using whole-wheat flour in place of all-purpose flour gives your cookies about four times the amount of fiber in every batch.

For more delicate-textured cookies or if you are still getting used to the taste and texture of whole-wheat, try using more finely milled whole-wheat pastry flour or mild-flavored white whole-wheat flour in place of about half of the all-purpose flour—you’ll still get the added benefit of extra fiber without much wheaty flavor.

Or try replacing 1/4 to 1/2 cup of the all-purpose flour with whole rolled oats or oats that have been ground into a “flour.”

Ground flaxseeds or flaxmeal can help add fiber to baked goods. Ground flaxseeds also contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid linked to cardiovascular health. Try adding 2 to 4 tablespoons of ground flaxseeds (or flaxmeal) to a batch of cookies. The flavor of flax complements oat-based cookies or cookies that are highly spiced, such as ginger molasses cookies or snickerdoodles.

Examples of cookies that use whole-wheat flour, whole-wheat pastry flour or oats in place of all-purpose flour, or contain flax:
Double Nut & Date Tassies
Fig ’n’ Flax Thumbprint Cookies
Orange Spice Molasses Cookies
Pineapple Coconut Bites
Ginger Crinkle Cookies
Blueberry White Chocolate Chunk Ginger Cookies

Next: 4. Keep Sodium In Check »


Connect With Us

20 minute dinner recipes
Advertisement
more smart savings

EatingWell Magazine

Advertisement
20 minute dinner recipes
Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner