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The Wild Salmon Debate

By David Dobbs, March/April 2008

A fresh look at farmed vs. wild.


READER'S COMMENT:
"This is such a thorough, informative, and valuable--not to mention very well-written--article. Thank you! It is just what I was looking for to get the facts on this matter. Thank you and bless you, David Dobbs. "
COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

Very informative BUT when looking at the fish farms, you only consider salmon as food for humans. These fish are an important part of the food chain for other living creatures.

Audrey Naese, Carmel, ME

Anonymous

09/01/2009 - 3:49pm

Very good article. Learned something else in a report by a Canadian scientist some time back - Norwegian-farmed salmon (in Norway) are safe as the gov't there inspects regularly, and if they find one (1) louse per two (2) fish, the farm is shut down. Unfortunately, Norwegian co.'s farm all over the world, and no other gov't regulates similarly...so If a restaurant tells me it's Norwegian-farmed on the menu, I have to ask "farmed IN Norway?" So far, only one restaurant has been able to tell me. I regularly hand out "good fish/bad fish' directories in my local stores & have discouraged some would-be buyers of the farmed product. More needs to be done, by gov't regulation. The strange thing is, frozen wild salmon (king and sockeye) are available here year 'round, and at lower prices than the farmed! They lose nothing in taste and texture when frozen. Thanks, & I hope you will follow up with more on this "debate".

Thomas Tizard, Kailua, HI

Anonymous

09/01/2009 - 3:49pm

What about those farm raised salmon that come from farms that claim to be environmentally sustainable? I am thinking of those farms which are certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)? I have kids and have been buying fish that have been raised eating vegetarian diets (to minimize mercury levels) and are produced by farms which are certified by the Marine Stewardship Council. I thought that this would get around two problems that I consider: 1) mercury levels in fish and 2) environmental impact. Am I wrong? Is wild still better on those two dimensions?

Anonymous, Cleveland, OH

Anonymous

09/01/2009 - 3:48pm

Very informative, well written article, I'm going wild !!

Mickey Macrils, Kennebunk, ME

Anonymous

09/01/2009 - 3:48pm



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