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July/August 2010 Letters to the Editor

By EatingWell Editors, September/October 2010


READER'S COMMENT:
"I was also taken aback by the lack of research performed to present a balanced view of the HFCS issue. Therefore, when I read the next section of great interest to me (cooking with microwaves), I was not surprised that there was not a...
COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

I was also taken aback by the lack of research performed to present a balanced view of the HFCS issue. Therefore, when I read the next section of great interest to me (cooking with microwaves), I was not surprised that there was not a single reference to actual research about the negative effects of microved food, just a couple of glib quotes in support. C'mon, how can one take any of your positions seriously?

Anonymous

11/11/2010 - 8:25pm

In Defense of Stephanie Pierson’s “Summer of Love,” July / August 2010

Reader Maureen Barnes wrote that she was deeply offended by Pierson’s response to hearing of her daughter’s sexual activity. Ms. Barnes needs to understand that sex IS a part of health; a healthy sexual relationship adds to overall body well-being, and repressing our natural instincts only causes problems. Adolescent interest in sex is normal; expecting teens to refrain from intercourse while the media bombards them daily with sex in every ad, and not giving teens proper education and advice about sex education is what has led America to be the leader in teen pregnancies. That Puritan ethic has backfired big time! On the contrary, I applaud Ms. Pierson’s relationship with her daughter, who clearly will have a reliable adult to consult in matters of heart and health.

Anonymous

10/03/2010 - 3:02pm

I am disappointed in Eating Well's article "The 13 Biggest Myths Busted". I had hoped that your magazine subscribed to a holistic vision of wellness, but recommending high fructose corn syrup, in even minute amounts is a poor suggestion. HCFS often contains trace amounts of mercury, left over from use as a catalyst in the process of synthesizing the product. HCFS is a by-product of the flooded corn market - a solution that compromises our physiological and environmental health. A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same.(www.grist.org "Researchers: HFCS is much worse than table sugar") Honey, agave syrup and dehydrated cane juice care metabolized differently HCFS, a point I was surprised your article did not emphasize.

Anonymous

09/20/2010 - 2:12am

While reading "The 13 Biggest Nutrition Myths Busted", in particular the feature on HFCS, I became very disappointed with Eating Well. Having recently subscribed to the magazine because I believed it was based on a whole-foods approach, I am re-considering renewal of my subscription. The article suggests that HFCS is digested by the body the same as refined sugar, however, the article does not address how the body digests HFCS differently than refined sugar. I do not promote use of refined sugars, and am startled HFCS was acknowledged as nothing worse than refined sugars or over use of alternative natural sweeteners (i.e. honey, agave nectar, etc.).

Anonymous

09/18/2010 - 5:04pm

In the article "The 13 Biggest Myths Busted," in the October 2010 issue, I was surprised that the section on high-fructose corn syrup did not mention anything about GMOs. High-fructose corn syrup is often made from genetically modified corn that has been sprayed with chemical pesticides and fertilizers. For this reason, we choose to avoid products made with HFC.

Anonymous

08/31/2010 - 10:16pm

I hate to be a grammar wonk, but it pains me to see a magazine about nutrition consistently misusing the words "healthy" and "unhealthy." People are healthy or unhealthy, but foods are healthful or unhealthful. We don't care about the health of the foods themselves; we care about the impact they have on our bodies. I love your magazine, and I would love to see your writers be as precise about the words they choose as they obviously are about the information they share. Thank you!

Anonymous

08/22/2010 - 11:24pm

I hate to be a grammar wonk, but it pains me to see a magazine about nutrition consistenly misusing the words "healthy" and "unhealthy." People are healthy or unhealthy, but foods are healthful or unhealthful. We don't care about the health of the foods themselves; we care about the impact they have on our bodies. I love your magazine, and I would love to see your writers be as precise about the words they choose as they obviously are about the information they impart. Thank you!

Anonymous

08/22/2010 - 11:22pm

When you mentioned a study that was mentioned at the website, "meatlessmonday.com" (instead of going to the PLOS Medicine article yourself, you again engaged in secondary journalism practices) you simply stated what meatlessmonday.com said about the saturated fat/heart disease article. If you had read the original empirical article, you'd have noted that the subject count was around 13,000. A recent study of 58,000 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no association between saturated fat and heart disease, and a recent JAMA article also noted, "Saturated fat - targeted by nearly all nutrition-related professional organizations and governmental agencies - has little relation to heard disease within most prevailing dietary patterns" (JAMA, 2010, p. 1). Please clean up you journalism, both with regard to citing secondary sources (never a good practice) and widening your investigative lens.

Ashley Mason, Tucson AZ

Anonymous

08/21/2010 - 12:19pm



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