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January/February 2010 Letters to the Editor

By EatingWell Editors, March/April 2010


READER'S COMMENT:
"Eggs.. As a former farm girl, I read with amusement your statement that "brown eggs come from red hens with red earlobes." I've never studied chicken earlobes, but I can tell you that many of the chickens that lay white eggs like the...
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Eggs..

As a former farm girl, I read with amusement your statement that "brown eggs come from red hens with red earlobes." I've never studied chicken earlobes, but I can tell you that many of the chickens that lay white eggs like the leghorns are known for their eggs and not their meat. Chickens that lay brown, green, or even blue eggs may not lay as many eggs a year, but their meat is considered superior to the thinner, smaller meatiness of the leghorns. I grew up with a white-feathered chicken called white rock, similar to the Rhode Island red chickens that I assume your article was referring to when it implied that only red hens lay brown eggs. There are many breeds that lay brown eggs. Researching on the internet you will find that your information was only partially correct by implying that only red chickens lay brown eggs.
Barbara from MI

Anonymous

06/06/2010 - 9:46pm

I love the magazine and all the great ideas but I give you a grade of "INCOMPLETE" for the article regarding the Big Mac on page 16. If you add up all the costs and allocate accordingly to those attributable to fast food hamburgers you'll come out with less the $.01 per hamburger! Guess I'll walk away from that Big Mac now that I know it costs $3.51 rather than $3.50! I suggest that you complete the article for a report without outcomes is incomplete at best and not meaningful at worst.

Gene, Wernersville, PA

Anonymous

03/29/2010 - 4:52pm

How is it that following "the Fresh Q&A"/Cool foor for Our Planet" (p.14) advising readers to "limit meat...(as) industry meat production is energy intensive -- it's one of the major factors in the food system impacting climate change.." and "Green Eating/Is your burger really that cheap?" (p. 16) noting the tolls on the environment, the taxpayers, and on public health," and "Fresh Findings/My Big Fat Hangover" (p. 20) siting a study that shows how meat-fed mice have brains less resistant to appetite suppressing hormones leptin and insulin..." how is it that following these thoughtful words of advice for "Eating Well" you provide not one, not two, but eight recipes for meat dishes and only four for vegetarian? Jeanne V., San Diego

Anonymous

02/22/2010 - 11:26am

Your Mar/Apr 2010 was especially informative. I enjoyed reading all the articles & recipes, especially those about the avocado. And I really liked the one about pressure cooking. I've always been shocked by the number of people who've never used a pressure cooker. They don't know what they're missing! I'm in the market for a new one - I just hope I can find one larger than my old 4-Qt., in aluminum. I don't like my stainless steel job because it takes way too long to heat up to the cooking stage. Love your magazine....long time subscriber Deborah Butler

Anonymous

02/19/2010 - 2:33pm



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