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EatingWell Blogs (Page 1)

February 2, 2016 - 2:54pm

The scene: My kitchen. The time: Tonight, about 30 minutes before everyone melts down from starvation. The options: Join in the meltdown; scrounge around for enough money to order pizza; or do something special with those innocent-looking potatoes in the pantry. I bought them recently, thinking it would be a good idea to have potatoes in the house, just in case. And in this case, I can turn them into Asparagus & Ham Stuffed Potatoes in 30 minutes and turn dinner drama into a satisfying family meal. (At less than $3 per serving, it’s cheaper than pizza too.)

Don’t Miss: Loaded Twice-Baked Potatoes and More Healthy Baked Potato Recipes

The potatoes are easily cooked in the microwave while you organize the “stuff” to stuff them...

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February 1, 2016 - 4:44pm

Confession time: I’m a brownie snob. For years I’ve turned up my nose at “blondies.” (OK, maybe there’s a little “brunettes vs. blondes” thing going on too.) Given the choice, I’d always pick a fudgy brownie over a wan beige blondie more defined by its lack of chocolate than the presence of any particular identity of its own.

Don’t Miss: Rocky Road Brownies and Skinny Dessert Bar Recipes

But recently I’ve reconsidered my prejudices. A story in EatingWell Magazine, “Rediscovering Quinoa,” brought Almond Butter-Quinoa Blondies into my life and that changed everything.

These beautiful squares mix up in 10 minutes with just a few ingredients—and best...

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January 28, 2016 - 9:59am

Don't judge a vegetable by its color alone. Vibrant fruits and vegetables have standout appeal, but recommendations to "eat the rainbow" can exclude one underappreciated category: white fruits and vegetables. These boast a variety of flavors and noteworthy nutrition accolades, according to research published in Advances in Nutrition. The researchers pointed out that many nutrients—including several that Americans don't get enough of—and good-for-you phytochemicals that give fruits and veggies their health benefits are not always colorful. Here are 6 reasons (and recipes) to eat more onions, turnips, cauliflower, potatoes, pears and garlic.

1. Onions

Rich in the antioxidant quercetin, onions may ease hay fever, eczema and food allergies, according to Japanese researchers.

Recipe:...

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January 28, 2016 - 9:08am

When the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were released, they were met with mixed reactions. We're excited to share our advisor Dr. David Katz's response to the report:

I won't mince words: in my opinion, the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, are a national embarrassment. They are a betrayal of the diligent work of nutrition scientists, and a willful sacrifice of public health on the altar of profit for well-organized special interests. This is a sad day for nutrition policy in America. It is a sad day for public health. It is a day of shame. I know, I should tell you what I really think. Maybe next time.

Don't Miss: 10 Ways Big Food is Changing...

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January 27, 2016 - 1:34pm

Cooking in a small kitchen can turn anyone into a minimalist. A cake pan? Forget about it; birthdays only come once a year. A toaster oven? Let your broiler do the work! But the one must-have tool you must keep in your cooking arsenal is the muffin tin. It just may be one of the coolest tools you own. Obviously, it’s great for muffins—but you can use it for so much more. And, of course, with a muffin tin you’ve got the assurance of built-in portion control. Get out your muffin tin and let the magic begin. From lasagna to sumptuous mini pies, these six foods get a whole new look.

Download a FREE 20-Minute Dinner Recipes Cookbook!






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