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EatingWell Blogs (Page 1)

June 24, 2015 - 12:01am

Surprisingly versatile, protein-packed and practically prep-free, shelled edamame are the start of light and fast dinners.

Soybean Savvy
Edamame are soybeans harvested before they are fully mature. These beans are green, unlike their grayish-white mature counterparts used to make tofu and soymilk. If you spy fresh edamame at your farmers’ market, scoop them up immediately—their taste and texture can’t be beat. Figure that 12 ounces of in-the-pod edamame yields about 11/4 cups shelled.

At the Supermarket
Seek out edamame in the freezer section of your supermarket or its frozen natural-foods section. Package sizes of shelled edamame vary from 8 to 16 ounces, so check the bag before you buy. (A 16-ounce package contains about 3 cups.) If you want to avoid GMOs, buy organic edamame or look for the “Non...

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May 26, 2015 - 12:55pm

Water and our everyday habits are inextricably connected. With 2014 being California’s fourth driest year on record, there’s a renewed focus on this precious resource. Here are some easy ways you can help conserve at home.

Load the Dishwasher
Most newer, efficient dishwashers use much less water than washing by hand; make sure it’s full to get the most out of your water.

Use It Twice
When you rinse produce, save the water to put on your plants.

Xeriscape
Design your landscape to reduce the need for water. Try drought-tolerant plants like cacti, and herbs that need less water, such as sage and thyme.

Good to the Last Drop
Use a rain barrel to collect water for your garden.

Check for Efficiency
Consider...

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May 14, 2015 - 3:41pm

We lined up the usual suspects—mustard, ketchup, mayo and relish—and took a closer look at the nutrition stats of our favorite burger and dog toppings. What we found: it’s easy to rack up sodium and overrun your 2,300 mg daily limit (plus some extra calories and sugar) when you use a heavy hand with the condiments. Here’s what to know before you stock up for your summer BBQs.



KetchupKetchup
Ketchup has about 4 grams (1 teaspoon) of sugar per tablespoon, most of which is added sugar (aim for no more than 6-9 teaspoons of added sugar per day). There’s not a lot of variation among brands, so choose your favorite.


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April 28, 2015 - 12:42pm

When I entertain, I often make Mexican food. It’s easy, budget-friendly and everyone loves it. Plus I can please vegetarians, vegans, omnivores and even kids without making myself crazy, and the leftovers are always welcome.

With Cinco de Mayo around the corner, I’m already planning my next Mexican fiesta. Lucky for me (and you!), I have the perfect Mexican menu all queued up. Fresh salsas, melt-in-your-mouth steak, creamy black beans, zesty shrimp and more recipes that seem impressive, but are actually incredibly simple, will line my table and fill my friends’ plates. Huge bonus: Almost everything can be made in advance, so you have little to do but enjoy hanging out with your guests.

This menu comes courtesy of Mexico City-born chef Roberto Santibañez. He now calls New York City home and cooks up delicious Mexican fare in his Fonda...

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April 24, 2015 - 12:20pm

Listen up. I have a secret to share, one that I rarely admit. I really like hot dogs. So when I first discovered uncured hot dogs (also labeled “no nitrates or nitrites added”), I immediately bought them.

Nitrates and nitrites are key in hot dogs and other cured meats like ham and bacon: they prevent spoilage and block the growth of the bacterium that causes botulism (a foodborne illness). They’re types of salts, with nitrates naturally found in many vegetables and converted to nitrites in your body—or in the lab. But I also knew the preservatives are believed to be associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer.

So these uncured dogs were the healthier choice, right? Turns out most uncured meats still have nitrates/nitrites in them—they just come from a natural source like celery powder. They’re labeled “uncured” and “no nitrates or...

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