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Stacy Fraser's Blog (Page 1)

June 17, 2016 - 9:07am

Warm, soapy water plus some elbow grease is technically the only DIY cleaning solution you need to prevent the growth of most illness-causing bacteria on kitchen surfaces. Before and after food preparation, simply scrub counters, sinks and cutting boards with hot, sudsy water for at least 20 seconds, then rinse well. Wipe dry with a clean towel or let air-dry.

Related: 15 Simple Ways To Clean Up Your Kitchen

For added assurance after preparing raw meat or as part of a weekly deep-clean routine, you can sanitize with distilled white vinegar, hydrogen peroxide or a homemade bleach solution. Pour full-strength vinegar or hydrogen peroxide solution into a spray bottle, evenly spritz onto the surfaces and let stand for...

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June 9, 2016 - 9:54am

Q. Can I use wax paper instead of parchment paper? —D. Piazza, San Diego, CA

Related: Do I Need Both Liquid and Dry Measuring Cups?

A. Wax paper and parchment paper can be used interchangeably in many applications, but not all. Wax paper melts when exposed to heat, while parchment can withstand temperatures up to 450°F, depending on the brand. Both types of paper are a great surface for rolling out pastry dough to prevent sticking and for layering cookies and candies when storing. But parchment paper is the one to choose when lining a baking sheet for a batch of cookies or a pan for roasting meat or vegetables. It’s also the only paper to use when cooking en papillote (i.e...

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March 15, 2016 - 11:31am

A well-seasoned cast-iron skillet is virtually nonstick, so it’s worth taking the time to season (or re­season) correctly. If you have a new skillet or an old one you want to rehab, the method is the same:

Don't Miss: 23 Healthy Recipes for Your Cast-Iron Skillet

• Cover the bottom of the pan with a thick layer of kosher salt.

• Add about half an inch of oil and place over high heat.

• When the oil starts to smoke, pour the salt and oil into a heatproof bowl to cool before discarding.

• Using a ball of paper towels, rub the inside of the pan until smooth.

• When you clean your cast-iron skillet, don’t use soap or a dishwasher. Just scrub it with a stiff brush and...

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February 12, 2016 - 9:21am

The not-too-pleasant smell that can settle into the cloths you use to wash dishes or wipe up counters is from microscopic kitchen gunk that gets trapped in the fibers. Oils, fats and bacteria accumulate in the cloths as you use them. If they aren't washed frequently (using the right method), the oils become rancid and bacteria start to grow and put off a pretty funky smell, especially if you have a good sniffer.

Don't Miss: 15 Simple Ways to Clean Up Your Kitchen

Wash your dish rag out after each use with dish soap and hot water (don't just rinse it). Then thoroughly wring it out and hang it in a spot where it can dry out a little in between uses. The dish soap helps dissolve any fats and a...

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November 10, 2015 - 2:48pm

Save room for this! Whether you call it stuffing or dressing, there’s more than one way to make it better. Our master recipe helps you make a lightened-up version of this must-have holiday side.

1. Start With Dry (Not Stale) Bread

Dry bread (almost as dry as croutons) absorbs liquid and seasoning better than fresh (or even stale). To dry out your bread: Spread 10 cups 1/2- to 1-inch bread cubes (from 1-1 1/2 pounds) on a large rimmed baking sheet. Bake at 275°F until dry to the touch, about 30 minutes. Let cool; transfer to a large bowl.

Breads:
Challah
Cornbread
French
talian
Multigrain
Pumpernickel
Rye
Sourdough
Whole-wheat

2. Load Up On Veg Or Fruit

A base of sautéed vegetables makes the best stuffing: Heat 2 Tbsp....read full post »
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